Upcoming Events at The Bookworm

The author signings, in-house book clubs and other events shown below are free and open to the public.     

The Bookworm offers in-house book clubs that you can attend when the featured books fit your interests and schedule. Readers receive a 20% book club discount on the books selected for discussion. The Bookworm provides facilitators to help lead the discussions for many of the in-house book clubs. If you have suggestions for groups, or are willing to facilitate discussions, please let us know

 Why buy books in your local independent bookstore?

  •  You may be about  to make a purchase you'll value for the rest of your life
  • You'll be shopping where you live
  • You'll be helping create local jobs
  • You might just find a book you never knew existed
  • You'll find great gifts for friends and family
  • You can talk to real people about books they know and love
  • You'll be part of your local book-loving community

 

 


Monday, February 19 / 6:30 | The Droids and Dragons Book Club will discuss The Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett (Harper, $9.99). Terry Pratchett has invented a phantasmagorical universe in which a blissfully naive interplanetary tourist called Twoflower joins up with a drop-out wizard whose spells only seem to work half of the time. Together they undertake a chaotic voyage through a crazy world filled with monsters and dragons, heroes and knaves. Pratchett has taken the sword and sorcery fantasy tradition and turned it on its ear to create an entertaining and bizarre spoof.

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, February 22 / 2 p.m. | Cather and Friends reads and discusses the work of Willa Cather, her contemporaries, and fellow Nebraskans.  Tea will be served, so bring your favorite cup. Please call 402-392-2877 to register or sign up at the store. The book for February discussion will be Death Comes for the Archbishop (Vintage, $15.00).  When Latour arrives in 1851 in the territory of New Mexico, what he finds is a vast desert region that is American by law but Mexican and Indian in custom and belief. Over the next four decades, Latour works gently and tirelessly to spread his faith and to build a soaring cathedral out of the local golden rock--while contending with unforgiving terrain, derelict and sometimes rebellious priests, and his own loneliness.  Death Comes for the Archbishop shares a limitless, craggy beauty with the New Mexico landscape of desert, mountain, and canyon in which its central action takes place, and its evocations of that landscape and those who are drawn to it suggest why Cather is acknowledged without question as the most poetically exact chronicler of the American frontier.  

 

 

 

Thursday, February 22 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group will continue their discussion of The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience, Second Edition by Francisco Varela, Evan Thompson and Eleanor Rosch (MIT Press, $30.00). This classic book was one of the first to propose the "embodied cognition" approach in cognitive science. It pioneered the connections between phenomenology and science and between Buddhist practices and science -- claims that have since become highly influential. Through this cross-fertilization of disparate fields of study, The Embodied Mind introduced a new form of cognitive science called "enaction," in which both the environment and first person experience are aspects of embodiment. This revised edition clarifies central arguments of the work and discuss and evaluate subsequent research that has expanded on the themes of the book, including the renewed theoretical and practical interest in Buddhism and mindfulness. 

 

 

 

Saturday, February 24 / 10 a.m. | The American History Book Club will discuss The Great Divide: The Conflict Between Washington and Jefferson That Defined America, Then and Now by Thomas Fleming (Da Capo, $17.50). History tends to cast the early years of America in a glow of camaraderie, but there were many conflicts between the Founding Fathers--and none more important than the clash between Washington and Jefferson. In The Great Divide, acclaimed historian Thomas Fleming examines how the differing temperaments and leadership styles of Washington and Jefferson shaped two opposing views of the presidency and the nation, and how this rift profoundly influenced the next two centuries of America's history and resonates to the present day. 

 

 

 

 

Monday, February 26 / 2 p.m. | The World War II Book Group will discuss The German War: A Nation Under Arms, 1939-1945 by Nicholas Stargardt (Basic Books, $22.99). As early as 1941, Allied victory in World War II seemed all but assured. How and why, then, did the Germans prolong the barbaric conflict for three and a half more years? In The German War, acclaimed historian Nicholas Stargardt portrays wartime Germany, bringing the hopes and expectations of the German people - from infantrymen and tank commanders on the Eastern front to civilians on the home front - to vivid life. While most historians identify the German defeat at Stalingrad as the moment when the average German citizen turned against the war effort, Stargardt demonstrates that the Wehrmacht in fact retained the staunch support of the patriotic German populace until the bitter end.

 

 

 

 

Monday, February 26 / 6:30 p.m. | The Books To Die For  Group will discuss Champagne for One by Rex Stout (Bantam, $16.00, two mysteries in one volume with Champagne for One and Too Many Cooks). Faith Usher talked about taking her own life and even kept cyanide in her purse. So when she died from a lethal champagne cocktail in the middle of a high society dinner party, everyone called it suicide--including the police. But Nero Wolfe isn't convinced--and neither is Archie. Especially when Wolfe is warned by four men against taking the case. Deception, blackmail, and a killer who may have pulled off the perfect crime...it's a challenge Nero Wolfe can't resist. 

The Books To Die For  Group will continue their discussion of Rogue Male by Geoffrey Household (New York Review, $14.95). 1930-something: a professional hunter is passing through a Central European country that is in the thrall of a vicious dictator. The hunter wonders whether he can penetrate undetected into the dictator's private compound. He does. He has the potential target in his sites and is wondering whether to pull the trigger when security catches up with him. Imprisoned, tortured, doomed to a painful death, the hunter makes an extraordinary and harrowing escape, fleeing through enemy territory to the safety of his native England. But that safety is delusive: his pursuers will not be diverted from their revenge by national borders; the British government cannot protect him without seeming to endorse his deed. The hunter must flee society, and he goes literaly underground, like a fox to its earth. The hunter has become the hunted.  

 

 

Tuesday, February 27 / 6:30 p.m. | The Crime Through Time Book Group will discuss Jane Steele by Lyndsay Faye (Putnam, $16.00). An orphan, Jane Steele suffers first at the hands of her aunt and a cousin, then at a grim school where she fights for her very life until escaping to London, leaving the corpses of her tormentors behind her. After years of hiding from the law, Jane’s aunt dies and her childhood home has a new master: Mr. Charles Thornfield, who seeks a governess. Burning to know whether she is in fact the rightful heir, Jane takes the position incognito and learns that Highgate House is full of marvelously strange new residents. As Jane catches ominous glimpses of the pair's violent history and falls in love with the gruffly tragic Mr. Thornfield, she faces a terrible dilemma: Can she possess him--body, soul, and secrets--without revealing her own murderous past? 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, February 28 / 6 p.m. |The Mysterious Readers Book Group will discuss two Maisie Dobbs books by Jacqueline Winspear: A Lesson in Secrets ($14.99) and Elegy for Eddie ($15.99). In A Lesson in Secrets Maisie Dobbs' first assignment for the British Secret Service takes her undercover to Cambridge as a professor, and leads to the investigation of a murderous web of activities being conducted by the up-and-coming Nazi party. In Elegy for Eddie Maisie takes on her most personal case yet, a twisting investigation into the brutal killing of a street peddler that will take her from the working-class neighborhoods into London's circles of power. 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, March 1 / 6:30 p.m. | The Notable Novellas group will discuss The Call of the Wild by Jack London (Bantam, $4.99, Call of the Wild and White Fang together in one book). The Call Of The Wild is the story of Buck, a dog stolen from his home and thrust into the merciless life of the Arctic north to endure hardship, bitter cold, and the savage lawlessness of man and beast. Jack London's superb ability as a storyteller and his uncanny understanding of animal and human natures give these tales a striking vitality and power, and have earned him a reputation as a distinguished American writer.

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, March 3 / 10 a.m. | The Biography Discussion Group will discuss Eleanor and Hick: The Love Affair That Shaped a First Lady by Susan Quinn (Penguin, $18.00).  is a warm, intimate account of the love between Eleanor Roosevelt and reporter Lorena Hickok--a relationship that, over more than three decades, transformed both women's lives and empowered them to play significant roles in one of the most tumultuous periods in American history. 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, March 6 / 6:30 p.m. | The Killing Time Book Group will discuss Cross Justice by James Patterson (Grand Central, $15.99). Alex Cross’s cousin Stefan has been accused of a horrible, unthinkable murder, and Cross drives south to North Carolina for the first time in thirty-five years. Back home, he discovers a once proud community down on its luck, and local residents who don't welcome him with open arms. As Cross steps into his family home, the horrors of his childhood flood back -- and he learns that they're not really over. He brings all his skill to finding out the truth about his cousin's case. He's chasing too many loose ends -- a brutal killer, the truth about his own past, and justice for his cousin -- and any one of the answers might be fatal.

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, March 7 / Noon - 1 p.m.  | What Are You Reading? book chat. Join us to chat about favorite reads, books that changed your life, or the book you just couldn’t put down.  No need to make reservations--just come and enjoy a little conversation about books.  Carol Lynch facilitates the discussions.

 

 

Thursday, March 8 / 6 p.m. | Amiable Adult Readers Discussing Books Almost Always Read by Kids (Aardbaark) will discuss I Crawl Through It by A. S. King (Little, Brown, $10.99). Four teenagers are on the verge of exploding. The anxieties they face at every turn have nearly pushed them to the point of surrender: senseless high-stakes testing, the lingering damage of past trauma, the buried grief and guilt of tragic loss. They are desperate to cope, but no one is listening. So they will lie. They will split in two. They will turn inside out. They will even build an invisible helicopter to fly themselves far away...but nothing releases the pressure. Because, as they discover, the only way to truly escape their world is to fly right into it. 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, March 8 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group will continue their discussion of The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience, Second Edition by Francisco Varela, Evan Thompson and Eleanor Rosch (MIT Press, $30.00). This classic book was one of the first to propose the "embodied cognition" approach in cognitive science. It pioneered the connections between phenomenology and science and between Buddhist practices and science -- claims that have since become highly influential. Through this cross-fertilization of disparate fields of study, The Embodied Mind introduced a new form of cognitive science called "enaction," in which both the environment and first person experience are aspects of embodiment. This revised edition clarifies central arguments of the work and discuss and evaluate subsequent research that has expanded on the themes of the book, including the renewed theoretical and practical interest in Buddhism and mindfulness. 

 

 

 

Saturday, March 10 | Local Children’s Author Day at The Bookworm! Details to follow.

 

Sunday, March 11 / 11 a.m. | The Books and Bagels book group will discuss Eventide by Kent Haruf (Vintage, $16.00). The aging McPheron brothers are learning to live without Victoria Roubideaux, the single mother they took in and who has now left their ranch to start college. A lonely young boy stoically cares for his grandfather while a disabled couple tries to protect their a violent relative. As these lives unfold and intersect, Eventide unveils the immemorial truths about human beings: their fragility and resilience, their selfishness and goodness, and their ability to find family in one another. 

 

 


 

 

Wednesday, March 14 / 6:30 p.m. | The Wednesday Bookworms will discuss The Life We Bury by Allen Eskens (Seventh Street Books, $15.95). College student Joe Talbert has the modest goal of completing a writing assignment for an English class. His task is to interview a stranger and write a brief biography of the person. With deadlines looming, Joe heads to a nearby nursing home to find a willing subject. There he meets Carl Iverson, and soon nothing in Joe's life is ever the same. Iverson is a dying Vietnam veteran--and a convicted murderer. With only a few months to live, he has been medically paroled to a nursing home, after spending thirty years in prison for the crimes of rape and murder. As Joe writes about Carl's life, especially Carl's valor in Vietnam, he cannot reconcile the heroism of the soldier with the despicable acts of the convict. Joe, along with his skeptical female neighbor, throws himself into uncovering the truth, but he is hamstrung in his efforts by having to deal with his dangerously dysfunctional mother, the guilt of leaving his autistic brother vulnerable, and a haunting childhood memory. 

 

 

 

Thursday, March 15 / 6 p.m. | The World War II At Night Group will discuss Hemingway at War: Ernest Hemingway's Adventures as a World War II Correspondent by Terry Mort (Pegasus, $15.95). Hemingway threw himself into the thick of events and so became a conduit to understanding some of the major events and characters of the war He flew missions with the; he went on a landing craft on Omaha Beach on D-Day; he went on to involve himself in the French Resistance forces in France and rode into the still dangerous streets of liberated Paris. And he was at the German Siegfried line for the horrendous killing ground of the Huertgen Forest, in which his favored 22nd Regiment lost nearly man they sent into the fight. After that tragedy, it came to be argued, he was never the same This invigorating narrative is also an investigation into Hemingway's subsequent work--much of it stemming from his wartime experience--which shaped the latter stages of his career in dramatic fashion. 

 

 

 

Thursday, March 15 / 6:30 p.m. | The As the Worm Turns Book Group will discuss The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte (Penguin, $14.00). Compelling in its imaginative power and bold naturalism, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall opens in the autumn of 1812, when a mysterious woman who calls herself Helen Graham seeks refuge at the desolate moorland mansion of Wildfell Hall. Bronte's enigmatic heroine becomes the object of gossip and jealousy as neighbors learn she is escaping from an abusive marriage and living under an assumed name. Ellen Scott will facilitate the discussion.

 

 

 

 

Saturday, March 17 / 3 p.m. | The Literature by People of Color Group’s selection is pending.

 

 

Monday, March 19 / 6:30 | The Droids and Dragons Book Club will discuss The Fifth Season by N. K. Jemisin (Orbit, $15.99). In a post-apocalyptic world plagued by natural disasters, Essun lives in a small community barricaded against the outside world. When her husband realizes that she and her children are orogenes with the ability to manipulate seismic energy, he kills their son and kidnaps their daughter. Against the backdrop of the end of the world, Essun follows, beginning an odyssey which will not end until her daughter is safe. 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, March 21 / 3 p.m. | The Second Opinion Pop-Up group will discuss Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: An Indian History of the American West by Dee Brown (Owlet, $19.00) in March and for a second opinion, The Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West by Peter Cozzens (Vintage, $20.00) in April.

In Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, Brown used council records, autobiographies, and firsthand descriptions to allow chiefs and warriors of the Dakota, Ute, Sioux, Cheyenne, and other tribes to tell us in their own words of the series of battles, massacres, and broken treaties that finally left them and their people demoralized and decimated. A unique and disturbing narrative told with force and clarity, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee changed forever our vision of how the West was won, and lost. It tells a story that should not be forgotten, and so must be retold from time to time.  

In The Earth Is Weeping, Cozzens explores the wars and negotiations that destroyed tribal ways of life even as they made possible the emergence of the modern United States, giving us both sides in comprehensive and singularly intimate detail. He illuminates the encroachment experienced by the tribes and the tribal conflicts over whether to fight or make peace and explores the lives of soldiers posted to the frontier and the ethical quandaries faced by generals who often sympathized with their native enemies. 

 

Thursday, March 22 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group will continue their discussion of The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience, Second Edition by Francisco Varela, Evan Thompson and Eleanor Rosch (MIT Press, $30.00). This classic book was one of the first to propose the "embodied cognition" approach in cognitive science. It pioneered the connections between phenomenology and science and between Buddhist practices and science -- claims that have since become highly influential. Through this cross-fertilization of disparate fields of study, The Embodied Mind introduced a new form of cognitive science called "enaction," in which both the environment and first person experience are aspects of embodiment. This revised edition clarifies central arguments of the work and discuss and evaluate subsequent research that has expanded on the themes of the book, including the renewed theoretical and practical interest in Buddhism and mindfulness. 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, March 24 / 10 a.m. | The American History Book Club will discuss Rough Riders: Theodore Roosevelt, His Cowboy Regiment, and the Immortal Charge Up San Juan Hill by Mark Lee Gardner (Morrow, $16.99). The Rough Riders were a volunteer regiment recruited in 1898 to help drive the Spaniards out of Cuba. Drawn from America's southwestern territories and led by the irrepressible Theodore Roosevelt, these men included not only cowboys and other Westerners, but also several Ivy Leaguers and clubmen, many of them friends of "TR." Roosevelt and his men quickly came to symbolize American ruggedness, daring, and individualism. He led them to victory in the famed Battle of San Juan Hill, which made TR a national hero and cemented the Rough Riders' iconic place in history. 

 

 

 

 

Monday, March 26 / 6:30 p.m. | The Books To Die For  Group will discuss Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier (Avon, $7.99). With a husband she barely knew, the young bride arrived at this immense estate, only to be inexorably drawn into the life of the first Mrs. de Winter, the beautiful Rebecca, dead but never forgotten...her suite of rooms never touched, her clothes ready to be worn, her servant -- the sinister Mrs. Danvers -- still loyal. And as an eerie presentiment of evil tightened around her heart, the second Mrs. de Winter began her search for the real fate of Rebecca for the secrets of Manderley. 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, March 27 / 6:30 p.m. | The Crime Through Time Book Group will discuss Sacred Games by Gary Corby (Soho, $15.95). It is the Olympics of 460 BC. Nico's best friend, Timodemus, is a competitor in the pankration, the deadly martial art of ancient Greece. Timo is the favorite to win. His only serious rival is Arakos from Sparta. When Arakos is found beaten to death, it is obvious Timodemus must be the killer. Who else could have killed the second-best fighter in all Hellas but the very best? Nico and his partner in sleuthing, the annoyingly clever priestess Diotima, have four days to save their friend and avert a war that would tear their world apart. 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, March 28 / 6 p.m. |The Mysterious Readers Book Group will discuss two Maisie Dobbs books by Jacqueline Winspear: Leaving Everything Most Loved and A Dangerous Place ($15.99 each).  In Leaving Everything Most Loved Maisie is contacted by an Indian gentleman who has come to England in the hopes of finding out who killed his sister two months ago. Scotland Yard failed to make any arrest in the case, and there is reason to believe they failed to conduct a thorough investigation. The case becomes even more challenging when another Indian woman is murdered just hours before a scheduled interview.  In A Dangerous Place, on a ship bound for England, Maisie realizes she isn't ready to return to England and disembarks in Gibraltar. In the British garrison town at the southern tip of Spain, she becomes enmeshed in the murder of Sebastian Babayoff, a photographer and member of Gibraltar's Sephardic Jewish community. Meanwhile, at a crossroads between her past and future, Maisie must choose a direction, knowing that England is, for her, an equally dangerous place, but in quite a different way. 

 

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