Upcoming Events at The Bookworm

The author signings, in-house book clubs and other events shown below are free and open to the public.     

The Bookworm offers in-house book clubs that you can attend when the featured books fit your interests and schedule. Readers receive a 20% book club discount on the books selected for discussion. The Bookworm provides facilitators to help lead the discussions for many of the in-house book clubs. If you have suggestions for groups, or are willing to facilitate discussions, please let us know

 

 


Tuesday, October 17 / 6:00 p.m. | Alan Wilkinson will sign Cody, the Medicine Man and Me.  Ray West is a middle-aged British university lecturer who reluctantly embarks on a field-trip in the USA that transforms into the ultimate voyage of personal discovery. Ray trails across Utah, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado and New Mexico in an attempt to track down his long-lost twin brother and establish the truth about his baffling family history. Old sibling rivalries resurface and a showdown brews - but ultimately only one of the brothers can ride off into the sunset. Alan Wilkerson explains why he's back in Nebraska for his sixteenth visit: "I fell in love with the place as soon as I crossed the river from Missouri. The more I saw, the more I wanted to know. I became fascinated with the writings of Willa Cather, then Mari Sandoz, and the landscapes that inspired them." 

 

 

 

Tuesday, October 17 / 6:30 p.m.  | The International Intrigue Book Group will discuss Raven Black by Ann Cleeves (Thomas Dunne, $16.99). Raven Black begins on New Year's Eve with a lonely outcast named Magnus Tait, who stays home waiting for visitors who never come. But the next morning the body of a murdered teenage girl is discovered nearby, and suspicion falls on Magnus. Inspector Jimmy Perez enters an investigative maze that leads deeper into the past of the Shetland Islands than anyone wants to go. 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, October 18 / 6:00 p.m. | Publisher Book Talk featuring reading selections for your personal enjoyment as well as gift ideas for the holidays.  Are you interested in finding a title for book club but don’t know where to start?  Maybe you’re interested in a good vacation read.  Or just possibly you’d like to find a book that you really love.  Join Penguin Random House representatives Bridget Piekarz and Jason Goble as they suggest a variety of titles for your consideration.   Feel free to bring something to eat or drink …. and don’t forget your pen!

 

 

 

Thursday, October 19 / 6 p.m. | The World War II At Night Group will discuss Stalingrad: The City That Defeated the Third Reich by Jochen Hellbeck (Public Affairs, $18.99). The turning point of World War II came at Stalingrad. Hitler's soldiers stormed the city in September 1942 in a bid to complete the conquest of Europe. After months of bitter fighting, 100,000 surviving Germans, huddled in the ruined city, surrendered to Soviet troops. During the battle and shortly after its conclusion, Red Army commanders and soldiers, party officials and workers spoke with a team of historians from Moscow to record their conversations. The tapestry of their voices provides groundbreaking insights into the thoughts and feelings of Soviet citizens during wartime. These testimonials were so harrowing and candid that the Kremlin forbade their publication. Revealed here in English, they humanize the Soviet defenders and allow Jochen Hellbeck, in Stalingrad, to present a definitive new portrait of the most fateful battle of World War II. 

 

 

 

Thursday, October 19 / 6:30 p.m. | The As the Worm Turns Book Group will discuss You Will Not Have My Hate by Antoine Leiris (Penguin, $23.00). On November 13, 2015, Antoine Leiris's wife, Helene Muyal-Leiris, was killed by terrorists while attending a rock concert at the Bataclan Theater in Paris, in the deadliest attack on France since World War II. Three days later, Leiris wrote an open letter addressed directly to his wife's killers, which he posted on Facebook. He refused to be cowed or to let his seventeen-month-old son's life be defined by Helene's murder ... Now Leiris tells the full story of his grief and struggle. Lee Myers will lead the discussion. 

 

 

 

 

Friday, October 20 / 6 p.m. | Lydia Kang will sign Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything (Workman, $22.95). Looking back with fascination, horror, and not a little dash of dark, knowing humor, Quackery recounts the lively, at times unbelievable, history of medical misfires and malpractices. Ranging from the merely weird to the outright dangerous, here are dozens of outlandish, morbidly hilarious "treatments"--conceived by doctors and scientists, by spiritualists and snake oil salesmen (yes, they literally tried to sell snake oil) – that were predicated on a range of cluelessness, trial and error, and straight-up scams. With vintage illustrations, photographs, and advertisements throughout, Quackery seamlessly combines macabre humor with science and storytelling to reveal an important and disturbing side of the ever-evolving field of medicine. 

 

 

 

Sunday, October 22 / 1- 2 p.m. | Charles Peak and Twyla Hansen will read from their books, followed by a discussion with questions and answers, and then sign their works of poetry. 

The State Poet of Nebraska, Twyla Hansen’s most recent work is Rock-Tree-Bird ($16.00). From memories of the isolation and beauty of growing up on a farm, to a burgeoning awareness as a teenager of the economic and cultural forces waged against family farming, to coming to terms with the legacies of her parents after their passing, and, finally, arriving at an appreciation of nature and the environment wherever and whenever she finds it, Hansen offers poems that are alternately sad, sweet, funny, moving, human, and humane.

Charles Peek won the 2016 Nebraska Books Awards competition for poetry with Breezes on Their Way to Being Winds ($14.95). He’s also the author of Where We’ve Managed Somehow To Be ($12.00).

 

 

 

Monday, October 23 / 2 p.m. | The World War II Book Group will discuss Wahoo: The Patrols of America's Most Famous World War II Submarine by Richard O’Kane (Presidio, $19.00). The career of the USS Wahoo in sinking Japanese ships in the farthest reaches of the Empire is legendary in submarine circles. Christened three months after Pearl Harbor, Wahoo was commanded by the astonishing Dudley W. "Mush" Morton, whose originality and daring new techniques led to results unprecedented in naval history; among them, successful "down the throat" barrage against an attacking Japanese destroyer, voracious surface-running gun attacks, and the sinking of a four-ship convoy in one day. Wahoo took the war to Japan's front porch, and Morton became known as the Navy's most aggressive and successful sea raider. The full story is told by the person most qualified to tell it - her executive officer Richard O'Kane, who went on to become the leading submarine captain of the Second World War. 

 

 

 

 

Monday, October 23 / 6:30 p.m. | The Books To Die For  Group will discuss Friends of Eddie Coyle by George Higgins (Picador, $15.00). Higgins's seminal crime novel is a down-and-dirty tale of thieves, mobsters, and cops on the mean streets of Boston. When small-time gunrunner Eddie Coyle is convicted on a felony, he's looking at three years in the pen--that is, unless he sells out one of his big-fish clients to the DA. But which of the many hoods, gunmen, and executioners whom he calls his friends should he send up the river? Told almost entirely in crackling dialogue by a vivid cast of lowlifes and detectives, The Friends of Eddie Coyle is one of the greatest crime novels ever written. 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, October 24 / 6:30 p.m. | The Crime Through Time Book Group will discuss A Terrible Beauty: A Lady Emily Mystery by Tasha Alexander (Minotaur, $15.99). Lady Emily organizes a holiday in Greece but the pleasantries are brought to an abrupt halt when a man long believed dead greets the party at their island villa. Lord Philip Ashton, Colin's childhood best friend and Emily's first husband, has returned. But can Philip really be who he claims, even if he has the scars and stories to prove it? Where has he been for all this time? And will his undying love for Emily drive him to claim what's his? Intrigue mounts as Philip reveals that he has been plagued for the past few years by an illegal antiques trader who believes he is in possession of a piece of Achilles' helmet, a priceless relic that was stolen from him moments after he unearthed it on an archaeological dig. 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, October 25 / 6 p.m. | The Mysterious Readers Book Group will discuss Messenger of Truth by Jacqueline Winspear (Picador, $16.00). London, 1931. The night before an exhibition of his artwork opens at a famed Mayfair gallery, the controversial artist Nick Bassington-Hope falls to his death. The police rule it an accident, but Nick's twin sister, Georgina, a wartime journalist and an infamous figure in her own right, isn't convinced. When the authorities refuse to consider her theory that Nick was murdered, Georgina seeks out a fellow graduate from Girton College, Maisie Dobbs, psychologist and investigator, for help. Nick was a veteran of World War I, and before long the case leads Maisie to the desolate beaches of Dungeness in Kent, and into the sinister underbelly of the city's art world.

 

 

 

Thursday, October 26 / 2 p.m. | Cather and Friends reads and discusses the work of Willa Cather, her contemporaries, and fellow Nebraskans.  Tea will be served, so bring your favorite cup. Please call 402-392-2877 to register or sign up at the store. The book for October discussion will be My Antonia (Vintage, $10.00). Antonia Shimerda returns to Black Hawk, Nebraska, to make a fresh start after eloping with a railway conductor following the tragic death of her father. Accustomed to living in a sod house and toiling alongside the men in the fields, she is unprepared for the lecherous reaction her lush sensuality provokes when she moves to the city. Despite betrayal and crushing opposition, Antonia steadfastly pursues her quest for happiness -- a moving struggle that mirrors the quiet drama of the American landscape. 

 

 

 

Thursday, October 26 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group will continue their discussion of Wittgenstein: A Very Short Introduction by A. C. Grayling (Oxford University Press, $11.95). Ludwig Wittgenstein was an extraordinarily original thinker, whose influence on twentieth-century thinking far outside the bounds of philosophy alone. In this engaging Introduction, A.C. Grayling makes Wittgenstein's thought accessible to the general reader by explaining the nature and impact of Wittgenstein's views. He describes both his early and later philosophy, the differences and connections between them, and gives a fresh assessment of Wittgenstein's continuing influence on contemporary thought.

 

 

 

 

Saturday, October 28 / 10 a.m. | The American History Book Club will discuss Madison’s Gift: Five Partnerships That Built America by David Stewart (Simon & Schuster, $16.99). Short, plain, balding, neither soldier nor orator, low on charisma and high on intelligence, Madison cared more about achieving results than taking the credit. It was Madison who led the drive for the Constitutional Convention and pressed for an effective new government as his patron George Washington lent the effort legitimacy; Madison who wrote the Federalist Papers with Alexander Hamilton to secure the Constitution's ratification; Madison who corrected the greatest blunder of the Constitution by drafting and securing passage of the Bill of Rights with Washington's support; Madison who joined Thomas Jefferson to found the nation's first political party and move the nation toward broad democratic principles; Madison, with James Monroe, who guided the new nation through its first war in 1812, really its Second War of Independence; and it was Madison who handed the reins of government to the last of the Founders, Monroe. But it was his final partnership with Dolley that allowed Madison to escape his natural shyness and reach the greatest heights.

 

 

 

Saturday, October 28 / 1 p.m. | Marcus Doe will sign Catching Ricebirds: A Study of Letting Vengence Go ($16.95). Marcus Doe was born in Liberia, West Africa, in 1979. In 1990, a violent civil war erupted and Liberia was thrown into a time of fear, starvation, and death. Separated from his family, Marcus embarked on a remarkable journey to escape the war-ravaged country he loves and the wounds that he carried in his memory. Marcus's life unfolds in four movements: first as a young boy living in Monrovia, the capital of Liberia, during a period of growing unrest; second as a refugee fleeing from rebel forces that would kill him and his family without a second thought; third as a wanderer in foreign countries unable to return to his childhood home; and finally as an adult, coming to grips with the loss he experienced and longing to see his own healing extend to others still haunted by Liberia's suffering.

 

 

 

 

Sunday, October 29 / 1 p.m. | Benjamin Vogt will sign A New Garden Ethic: Cultivating Defiant Compassion for an Uncertain Future (New Society, $18.99). Benjamin Vogt addresses why we need a new garden ethic, and why we urgently need wildness in our daily lives, lives sequestered in buildings surrounded by monocultures of lawn and concrete that significantly harm our physical and mental health. He examines the psychological issues around climate change and mass extinction as a way to understand how we are short circuiting our response to global crises, especially by not growing native plants in our gardens. Simply put, environmentalism is not political, it's social justice for all species marginalized today and for those facing extinction tomorrow. By thinking deeply and honestly about our built landscapes, we can create a compassionate activism that connects us more profoundly to nature and to one another.

 

 

Wednesday, November 1 / Noon - 1 p.m. | What Are You Reading? book chat. Join us to chat about favorite reads, books that changed your life, or the book you just couldn’t put down.  No need to make reservations--just come and enjoy a little conversation about books.  Carol Lynch facilitates the discussions.

 

 

Thursday, November 2 / 6:30 p.m. | The Notable Novellas group will discuss Goodbye, Columbus by Phillip Roth (Vintage, $16.00). Roth's National Book Award -winning first book--about Neil Klugman, Brenda Patimkin, and their relationship which tests the boundaries of suspicion, social class, and love--instantly established its author's reputation as a writer of explosive wit, merciless insight, and a fierce compassion for even the most self-deluding of characters.

 

 

 

 

 

Friday, November 3 / 6 p.m. | Amy and Dave Freeman will sign A Year in the Wilderness: Bearing Witness in the Boundary Waters (Milkweed, $35.00). The Boundary Waters are one of our national treasures, yet their existence has been consistently threatened. When the Freemans learned of mining in the area's watershed, they decided to take action--by spending a year in the wilderness. This book tells the story of their adventure in northern Minnesota: of loons whistling under a moonrise, of mushrooms cooked over a fire, of a pine marten stalking a hare through winter's first snowfall. In visceral language and gorgeous photos, the Freemans show us the value of wilderness and why we must protect it. With the magic--and urgent message--that have brought an international audience to the Freemans' cause, A Year in the Wilderness is a rousing cry of witness activism and a stunning tribute to this special region.

 

 

 

Saturday, November 4 / 10 a.m. | The Biography Discussion Group will discuss Madison’s Gift: Five Partnerships That Built America by David Stewart (Simon & Schuster, $16.99). Short, plain, balding, neither soldier nor orator, low on charisma and high on intelligence, Madison cared more about achieving results than taking the credit. It was Madison who led the drive for the Constitutional Convention and pressed for an effective new government as his patron George Washington lent the effort legitimacy; Madison who wrote the Federalist Papers with Alexander Hamilton to secure the Constitution's ratification; Madison who corrected the greatest blunder of the Constitution by drafting and securing passage of the Bill of Rights with Washington's support; Madison who joined Thomas Jefferson to found the nation's first political party and move the nation toward broad democratic principles; Madison, with James Monroe, who guided the new nation through its first war in 1812, really its Second War of Independence; and it was Madison who handed the reins of government to the last of the Founders, Monroe. But it was his final partnership with Dolley that allowed Madison to escape his natural shyness and reach the greatest heights.

 

 

 

Monday, November 6 / 6:30 p.m. | The Lit Wits group will discuss The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood (Anchor, $15.95). Offred is a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead. She may leave the home of the Commander and his wife once a day to walk to food markets whose signs are now pictures instead of words because women are no longer allowed to read. She must lie on her back once a month and pray that the Commander makes her pregnant, because in an age of declining births, Offred and the other Handmaids are only valued if their ovaries are viable. Offred can remember the days before, when she lived and made love with her husband Luke; when she played with and protected her daughter; when she had a job, money of her own, and access to knowledge. But all of that is gone now....  Funny, unexpected, horrifying, and altogether convincing, The Handmaid's Tale is at once scathing satire and dire warning. 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, November 7 / 6:30 p.m. | The Killing Time Book Group will discuss The Life We Bury by Allen Eskins (Seventh Street Books, $15.95). College student Joe Talbert has the task is to interview a stranger and write a brief biography of the person. Joe heads to a nearby nursing home and meets Carl Iverson, and soon nothing in Joe's life is ever the same. Carl is a dying Vietnam veteran--and a convicted murderer. With only a few months to live, he has been medically paroled to a nursing home, after spending thirty years in prison for the crimes of rape and murder. As Joe writes about Carl's life, especially Carl's valor in Vietnam, he cannot reconcile the heroism of the soldier with the despicable acts of the convict. Joe, along with his skeptical female neighbor Lila, throws himself into uncovering the truth, but he is hamstrung in his efforts by having to deal with his dangerously dysfunctional mother, the guilt of leaving his autistic brother vulnerable, and a haunting childhood memory. Thread by thread, Joe unravels the tapestry of Carl's conviction. Will Joe discover the truth before it's too late to escape the fallout? 

 

 

 

Wednesday, November 8 / 6:30 p.m. | The Wednesday Bookworms will discuss Kitchens of the Great Midwest by Ryan Stradal (Penguin, $16.00). When Lars Thorvald’s wife, Cynthia, falls in love with wine and a dashing sommelier he’s left to raise their baby, Eva, on his own. He’s determined to pass on his love of food to his daughter starting with pureed pork shoulder. As Eva grows, she finds her solace and salvation in the flavors of her native Minnesota. From Scandinavian lutefisk to hydroponic chocolate habaneros, each ingredient represents one part of Eva’s journey as she becomes the star chef behind a legendary and secretive pop-up supper club, culminating in an opulent and emotional feast that’s a testament to her spirit and resilience.  Each chapter tells the story of a single dish and character, at once capturing the zeitgeist of the Midwest, the rise of foodie culture, and delving into the ways food creates community and a sense of identity.  

 

 

 

Thursday, November 9 / 6 p.m. | Amiable Adult Readers Discussing Books Almost Always Read by Kids (Aardbaark) will discuss two books:

Wait Till Helen Comes: A Ghost Story by Mary Downing Hahn (Clarion, $7.99). Twelve-year-old Molly and her ten-year-old brother, Michael, have never liked their seven-year-old stepsister, Heather. Now their parents have moved them all to live in a house that used to be a church, with a cemetery in the backyard. Heather starts talking to a ghost named Helen and warning Molly and Michael that Helen is coming for them. Molly feels certain Heather is in some kind of danger, but every time she tries to help, Heather twists things around to get her into trouble. And then Helen comes.

and

Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier (Graphix, $10.99). Catrina and her family have moved to the coast of Northern California for the sake of her little sister, Maya, who has cystic fibrosis--and Cat is even less happy about the move when she is told that her new town is inhabited by ghosts, and Maya sets her heart on meeting one.

 

 

Thursday, November 9 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group will use titles from the Very Short Introduction series to follow from the Enlightenment Era to the first part of the 20thcentury.  Although the books are brief they are compacted with much detail requiring thoughtful examination.  The book for November discussion is Habermas: A Very Short Introduction by Gordon Finlayson (Oxford University Press, $11.95). Jurgen Habermas is the most renowned living German philosopher. This book aims to give a clear and readable overview of his philosophical work. It analyzes both the theoretical underpinnings of Habermas's social theory, and its more concrete applications in the fields of ethics, politics, and law. Finally, it examines how Habermas's social and political theory informs his writing on real, current political and social problems. 

 

 

 

Saturday, November 11 / 3 p.m. | The Continental European Novel Group will discuss The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera (Harper, $18.99). A young woman is in love with a successful surgeon, a man torn between his love for her and his incorrigible womanizing. His mistress, a free-spirited artist, lives her life as a series of betrayals--while her other lover, earnest, faithful, and good, stands to lose everything because of his noble qualities. In a world where lives are shaped by irrevocable choices and fortuitous events, and everything occurs but once, existence seems to lose its substance, its weight. Hence we feel "the unbearable lightness of being." 

 

 

 

 

Sunday, November 12 / 11 a.m. | The Books and Bagels book group will discuss The Life We Bury by Allen Eskins (Seventh Street Books, $15.95). College student Joe Talbert has the task is to interview a stranger and write a brief biography of the person. Joe heads to a nearby nursing home and meets Carl Iverson, and soon nothing in Joe's life is ever the same. Carl is a dying Vietnam veteran--and a convicted murderer. With only a few months to live, he has been medically paroled to a nursing home, after spending thirty years in prison for the crimes of rape and murder. As Joe writes about Carl's life, especially Carl's valor in Vietnam, he cannot reconcile the heroism of the soldier with the despicable acts of the convict. Joe, along with his skeptical female neighbor Lila, throws himself into uncovering the truth, but he is hamstrung in his efforts by having to deal with his dangerously dysfunctional mother, the guilt of leaving his autistic brother vulnerable, and a haunting childhood memory. Thread by thread, Joe unravels the tapestry of Carl's conviction. Will Joe discover the truth before it's too late to escape the fallout? 


 

Thursday, November 16 / 6 p.m. | The World War II At Night Group will discuss American Warlords: How Roosevelt's High Command Led America to Victory in World War II by Jonathan Jordan (New American Library, $17.00). After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States was wakened from its slumber of isolationism. To help him steer the nation through the coming war, President Franklin Roosevelt turned to the greatest team of rivals since the days of Lincoln: Secretary of War Henry Stimson, Admiral Ernest J. King, and General George C. Marshall. Together, these four men led the nation through history s most devastating conflict and ushered in a new era of unprecedented American influence, all while forced to overcome the profound personal and political differences which divided them. A startling and intimate reassessment of U.S. leadership during World War II, American Warlords is a remarkable glimpse behind the curtain of presidential power. 

 

 

 

Thursday, November 16 / 6:30 p.m. | The As the Worm Turns Book Group will discuss Voracious: A Hungry Reader Cooks Her Way Through Great Books by Cara Nicoletti (Little Brown, $16.99). As a young bookworm reading in her grandfather's butcher shop, Cara Nicoletti saw how books and food bring people to life. Now a butcher, cook, and talented writer, she serves up stories and recipes inspired by beloved books and the food that gives their characters depth and personality. From the breakfast sausage in Laura Ingalls Wilder's Little House in the Big Woods to chocolate cupcakes with peppermint buttercream from Jonathan Franzen's The Corrections, these books and the tasty treats in them put her on the road to happiness.  Cooking through the books that changed her life, Nicoletti shares fifty recipes. Jackie Byers will facilitate the discussion. 

 

 

 

Saturday, November 18 / 1 p.m. | Shannon Baker will sign Dark Signal: A Kate Fox Novel (Forge, $26.99). Reeling from her recent divorce, Kate Fox has just been sworn in as Grand County, Nebraska Sheriff when tragedy strikes. A railroad accident has left engineer Chad Mills dead, his conductor Bobby Jenkins in shock. Kate soon realizes that the accident was likely murder. Who would want to kill Chad Mills? Kate finds that he made a few enemies as president of the railroad workers union. Meanwhile his widow is behaving oddly. And why was his neighbor Josh Stevens at the Mills house on the night of the accident? While her loud and meddling family conspires to help Kate past her divorce, State Patrol Officer Trey closes in on Josh Stevens as the suspect. Kate doesn't believe it. She may not have the experience, but she's lived in the Sandhills her whole life, and knows the land and the people. Something doesn't add up--and Kate must find the real killer before he can strike again. 

 

 

Monday, November 20 / 6:30 p.m. | The Droids and Dragons Book Club will discuss The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert Heinlein (Orb, $16.99). The Moon is a Harsh Mistress is a tale of revolution, of the rebellion of the former Lunar penal colony against the Lunar Authority that controls it from Earth. It is the tale of the disparate people--a computer technician, a vigorous young female agitator, and an elderly academic--who become the rebel movement's leaders. And it is the story of Mike, the supercomputer whose sentience is known only to this inner circle, and who for reasons of his own is committed to the revolution's ultimate success. The winner of the 1967 Hugo Award for Best Novel, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress is one of the high points of modern science fiction, a novel bursting with politics, humanity, passion, innovative technical speculation, and a firm belief in the pursuit of human freedom. 

 

 

 

Tuesday, November 21 / 6:30 p.m. | The International Intrigue Book Group will discuss Gold of Our Fathers by Kwei Quartey (Soho, $15.95). Darko Dawson has just been promoted to Chief Inspector in the Ghana Police Service, but it comes at a price. He is transferred to remote Obuasi, in the Ashanti region, an area now notorious for the illegal exploitation of its gold mines. His first case involves a body unearthed in one of the gold quarries, a Chinese immigrant named Bao Liu, one of many who have flocked to the Ashanti region to work the alluvial gold mines. The list of potential suspects is a long one, and Dawson must pursue it alone, because he can't trust his sergeant partner. 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, November 22 / 6 p.m. | The Mysterious Readers Book Group will not meet in November and December

 

Thursday, November 23 | The Bookworm will be closed in observance of Thanksgiving Day.

 

 

Saturday, November 25 / 10 a.m. | The American History Book Club will discuss American Spring by Walter Borneman (Back Bay, $18.00). When we reflect on our nation's history, the American Revolution can feel almost like a foregone conclusion. In reality, the first weeks of the war were much more tenuous, and a fractured and ragtag group of colonial militias had to coalesce to have even the slimmest chance of toppling the mighty British Army. American Spring follows a fledgling nation from Paul Revere's little-known ride of December 1774 and the first shots fired on Lexington Green through the catastrophic Battle of Bunker Hill, culminating with a Virginian named George Washington taking command of colonial forces. Focusing on the colorful heroes John Hancock, Samuel Adams, Mercy Otis Warren, Benjamin Franklin, and Patrick Henry, and the ordinary Americans caught up in the revolution, Borneman uses newly available sources and research to tell the story of how a decade of discontent erupted into an armed rebellion that forged our nation.

 

 

 

Saturday, November 25 / 1 p.m. | Karen Goldner will sign Passing Semis in the Rain: A Tina Johnson Adventure ($11.99). When your life falls apart, and it wasn't much of a life to begin with, the simple response for Tina Johnson is to head for New Orleans. Except it's not so simple when you look like a federal witness and mob bookkeeper who knows where a drug cartel keeps its cash, and now you're being hunted by the feds, the mob, and the cartel. What begins as a road trip quickly turns into a dangerous race to prevent an assassination and collect the big payoff. Along the way Tina discovers romance, friendship, and her own strength. From New Orleans to Miami, this is not the kind of vacation that visitor bureaus advertise.

 

 

 

 

 

Monday, November 27 / 2 p.m. | The World War II Book Group will discuss When Books Went to War: The Stories That Helped Us Win World War II by Molly Manning (Mariner, $15.95). When America entered World War II in 1941, we faced an enemy that had banned and burned 100 million books. Outraged librarians launched a campaign to send free books to American troops and gathered 20 million hardcover donations. In 1943, the War Department and the publishing industry stepped in with an extraordinary program: 120 million small, lightweight paperbacks for troops to carry in their pockets and rucksacks in every theater of war. These Armed Services Editions were beloved by the troops and are still fondly remembered today. Soldiers read them while waiting to land at Normandy, in hellish trenches in the midst of battles, in field hospitals, and on long bombing flights. When Books Went to War is the inspiring story of the Armed Services Editions, and a treasure for history buffs and book lovers alike. 

 

 

Monday, November 27 / 6:30 p.m. | The Books To Die For Group will discuss I the Jury – My Gun Is Quick – Vengence is Mine by Mickey Spillane (New American Library, $18.00). In Mickey Spillane's classic detective novels, the action exploded in a bone-crunching catharsis. Men and women didn't make love, they collided. Tough brutes used their fists to drive home a message. Tougher broads used guile. And no one's morals were loftier than the gutter. No apologies. Little redemption. They rendered critics powerless, shocked intellectuals, inspired a new wave of pulp mayhem, and left the public hungry for more. Find out for yourself in this omnibus featuring the first three Mike Hammer novels by the living master of the hard-boiled mystery.

 

 

 

Tuesday, November 28 / 6:30 p.m. | The Crime Through Time Book Group will discuss Secrets in the Stones by Tessa Harris (Kensington, $15.00). Newly released from the notorious asylum known as Bedlam, Lady Lydia Farrell finds herself in an equally terrifying position--as a murder suspect--when she stumbles upon the mutilated body of Sir Montagu Malthus in his study at Boughton Hall. Meanwhile Dr. Thomas Silkstone has been injured in a duel with a man who may or may not have committed the grisly deed of which Lydia is accused. Despite his injury, Thomas hopes to clear his beloved's good name by conducting a postmortem on the victim. With a bit of detective work, he learns that Montagu's throat was slit by no ordinary blade, but a ceremonial Sikh dagger from India--a clue that may be connected to the fabled lost mines of Golconda.  From the mysterious disappearance of a cursed diamond buried with Lydia's dead husband, to the undying legend of a hidden treasure map, Thomas must follow a trail of foreign dignitaries, royal agents--and even more victims--to unveil the sinister and shocking secrets in the stones. 

 

 

 

Thursday, November 30 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group will continue their discussion of Habermas: A Very Short Introduction by Gordon Finlayson (Oxford University Press, $11.95). Jurgen Habermas is the most renowned living German philosopher. This book aims to give a clear and readable overview of his philosophical work. It analyzes both the theoretical underpinnings of Habermas's social theory, and its more concrete applications in the fields of ethics, politics, and law. Finally, it examines how Habermas's social and political theory informs his writing on real, current political and social problems. 

 

 

 

 

 

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