Upcoming Events at The Bookworm

The author signings, in-house book clubs and other events shown below are free and open to the public.     

The Bookworm offers in-house book clubs that you can attend when the featured books fit your interests and schedule. Readers receive a 20% book club discount on the books selected for discussion. The Bookworm provides facilitators to help lead the discussions for many of the in-house book clubs. If you have suggestions for groups, or are willing to facilitate discussions, please let us know

 

April is National Poetry Month, a month for sharing and enjoying poetry.  Click here for more information.

 

Thursday, April 27 / 6 p.m. | NEW GROUP: The Philosophy Book Discussion Group shall initially draw from British and Germanic thinkers.  This split prompts a sharp distinction between science and theology/philosophy, as expressed in the division of ‘mind’ and ‘brain’.  A major focus will be to address philosophy as a personal or individual subject in relation to academic philosophers.  Using titles from the Very Short Introduction series, published by Oxford University Press, the initial chosen authors will follow chronologically from the Enlightenment Era to the first part of the 20thcentury.  Although the books are small and brief they are compacted with much detail requiring thoughtful examination.  The book for April discussion will be Hegel: A Very Short Introduction by Peter Singer (Oxford University Press, $11.95). Hegel is regarded as one of the most influential figures on modern political and intellectual development. Offering a broad discussion of Hegel's ideas and an account of his major works, Singer explains what have often been considered abstruse and obscure ideas in a clear and inviting manner. 

 

 

 

Saturday, April 29 | Visit The Bookworm to celebrate Independent Bookstore Day, a national party that takes place at indie bookstores across the country. Independent bookstores are not just stores; they’re community centers and local anchors run by passionate readers. They are entire universes of ideas that contain the possibility of real serendipity. They are lively performance spaces and quiet places where aimless perusal is a day well spent. In a world of tweets and digital downloads, bookstores are not a dying anachronism.  They are living, breathing organisms that continue to grow and expand. And they are at your service. Consumers control the marketplace by deciding where to spend their money. If what a bookstore offers matters to you, then shop at a bookstore. If you feel that the experience of reading a book is valuable, then read the book. This is how we change the world: we grab hold of it. We change ourselves

 

 

 

Authors joining us for Independent Bookstore Day from 1 to 3 p.m. will be Ryan Roenfeld, author of Wicked Omaha (History Press, $21.99) and John Schreier, author of Carter Lake: A Slice of Iowa in Nebraska (History Press, $21.99).

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday, April 30 / 2 p.m. | Omaha Magazine Launch Party at The Bookworm

 

 

May 1 - 7 | Celebrate Children’s Book Week and Screen-Free Week together!

Children’s Book Week is the annual celebration of books for young people and the joy of reading. Children’s Book Week is the longest-running national literacy initiative in the country. Every year, events are held nationwide at schools, libraries, bookstores, homes — wherever young readers and books connect! Click here for more information.

Screen-Free Week is when children, families—whole schools and communities—can rediscover the joys of life beyond the screen. Plan to unplug from digital entertainment and spend all that free time playing, daydreaming, creating, exploring and connecting with family and friends! One great way to unplug is reading books!  Click here for more information.

 

 

 

Monday, May 1 / 6:30 p.m. | The Lit Wits group will discuss Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf (Harvest, $13.95). In Mrs. Dalloway, the novel on which the movie The Hours was based, Virginia Woolf details Clarissa Dalloway’s preparations for a party of which she is to be hostess, exploring the hidden springs of thought and action in one day of a woman s life. The novel is considered to contain some of the most beautiful, complex, incisive and idiosyncratic sentences ever written in English, and that alone would be reason enough to read it. It is one of the most moving, revolutionary artworks of the twentieth century. 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, May 2 / 6:30 p.m. | The Killing Time Book Group will discuss The Hanging Girl by Jussi Adler-Olsen (Dutton, $16.00). In the middle of his usual hard-won morning nap in the basement of police headquarters, Carl Morck, head of Department Q, receives a call from a colleague working on the Danish island of Bornholm. Carl is dismissive when he realizes that a new case is being foisted on him, but a few hours later, he receives some shocking news that leaves his headstrong assistant Rose more furious than usual. Carl has no choice but to lead Department Q into the tragic cold case of a vivacious seventeen-year-old girl who vanished from school, only to be found dead hanging high up in a tree. The investigation will take them from the remote island of Bornholm to a strange sun-worshipping cult, where Carl, Assad, Rose, and newcomer Gordon attempt to stop a string of new murders and a skilled manipulator who refuses to let anything or anyone get in the way. 

 

 

 

Wednesday, May 3 / Noon - 1 p.m. | What Are You Reading? book chat. Join us to chat about favorite reads, books that changed your life, or the book you just couldn’t put down.  No need to make reservations--just come and enjoy a little conversation about books.  Carol Lynch facilitates the discussions.

 

 

Thursday, May 4 / 10 a.m. | Special Storytime at The Bookworm in celebration of Children’s Book Week and Screen-Free Week.

 

 

Thursday, May 4 – Monday, May 8 | Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting Weekend. Visit The Bookworm to see and purchase the books we will be selling at the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting.

 

 

Saturday, May 6 / 10 a.m. | The Biography Discussion Group will discuss The Firebrand and the First Lady: Portrait of a Friendship: Pauli Murray, Eleanor Roosevelt, and the Struggle for Social Justice by Patricia Bell-Scott (Vintage, $17.00). This is the riveting history of how a brilliant writer-turned-activist and the first lady of the United States forged an enduring friendship that helped to alter the course of race and racism in America. In 1938, the twenty-eight-year-old Pauli Murray wrote a letter to the President and First Lady, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, protesting racial segregation in the South. Eleanor wrote back. So began a friendship that would last for a quarter of a century, as Pauli became a lawyer, principal strategist in the fight to protect Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and a co-founder of the National Organization of Women, and Eleanor became a diplomat and first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. 

 

 

 

Tuesday, May 9 | Rainbow Rowell’s Carry On - The Rise and Fall of Simon Snow (St. Martin’s, $10.99) will arrive in paperback!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, May 10 / 6:30 p.m. | The Wednesday Bookworms will discuss The Tallgrass Prairie Reader by John Price (University of Iowa Press, $25.00). Prairie author and advocate John T. Price wondered what it would take to restore tallgrass prairie to its rightful place at the center of our collective identity. The answer to that question is his Tallgrass Prairie Reader, a collection of literature from and about the tallgrass bioregion. Focusing on autobiographical nonfiction in a wide variety of forms, voices, and approaches including adventure narrative, spiritual reflection, childhood memoir, Native American perspectives, literary natural history, humor, travel writing and reportage he honors the ecological diversity of tallgrass itself and provides a range of models for nature writers and students. 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, May 11 / 6 p.m. | Amiable Adult Readers Discussing Books Almost Always Read by Kids (Aardbaark) will discuss Teen Angst? Naaah…a quasi-autobiography by Ned Vizzini (Delacorte, $9.99). Ned Vizzini writes about the weird, funny, and sometimes mortifying moments that made up his teen years. With wit, irony, and honesty, Teen Angst? Naaah . . . invites you into Ned’s world of school, parents, cool (and almost cool), street people, rock bands, friends, fame, camp, sex (sort of), Cancun (almost), prom, beer, video games, and more. 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, May 11 / 6 p.m.| The Philosophy Book Discussion Group shall initially draw from British and Germanic thinkers. Using titles from the Very Short Introduction series, published by Oxford University Press, the initial chosen authors will follow chronologically from the Enlightenment Era to the first part of the 20thcentury.  Although the books are small and brief they are compacted with much detail requiring thoughtful examination.  The book for May discussion is Marx: A Very Short Introduction by Peter Singer (Oxford University Press, $11.95). Singer identifies the central vision that unifies Marx's thought, enabling us to grasp Marx's views as a whole. He sees him as a philosopher primarily concerned with human freedom, rather than as an economist or a social scientist.

 

 

 

 

Saturday, May 13 / 3 p.m.| Elise Parsley will sign If You Ever Want to Bring a Circus to the Library, Don't! (Little Brown, $17.99). If you see a poster that says "You Can Do Anything at the Library!," it is NOT giving you permission to put on a circus! But Magnolia doesn't see any problem with setting up her own big top. She's got a lot of gusto and one mean human cannonball routine. So what if her greatest show on Earth won't fit between the bookshelves? Elise Parsley's boldly expressive illustrations perfectly complement this mostly-librarian-approved guide on how to be everything BUT quiet in the library! 

 

 

.

 

 

Saturday, May 13 / 3 p.m.| The Continental European Novel Book Group shall begin with classics from several countries dating back to the mid-19th century. As the group grows and develops, the choices and purposes shall be to focus on major characters, plots, themes and assessment of the relevance for today’s reading audience.  The book for May discussion will be The Rebel: An Essay on man in Revolt by Albert Camus (Vintage, $14.95).  For Camus, the urge to revolt is one of the "essential dimensions" of human nature, manifested in man's timeless struggle against the conditions of his existence, as well as the popular uprisings against established orders throughout history. And yet, he shows how inevitably the course of revolution leads to tyranny. As old regimes throughout the world collapse, The Rebel resonates as an ardent, eloquent, and supremely rational voice of conscience for our tumultuous times. 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, May 16 / 6:30 p.m. | The International Intrigue Book Group will discuss The Golden Hour by Todd Moss (Putnam, $9.99). The Golden Hour: In international politics, the hundred hours following a coup, when there is still a chance that diplomacy, a secret back channel, military action something may reverse the chain of events. As the director of the new State Department Crisis Reaction Unit, Judd Ryker gets a chance to prove that his theory of the Golden Hour actually works, when there’s a coup in Mali. But in the real world, those hours include things he’s never even imagined. As Ryker races from Washington to Europe and across the Sahara Desert, he finds that personalities, loyalties everything he thought he knew begin to shift beneath his feet, and that friends and enemies come in many forms. 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, May 18 / 6 p.m. | Craig Johnson will sign The Highwayman: A Longmire Story (Penguin, $13.00). Sheriff Walt Longmire and Henry Standing Bear embark on their latest adventure when Wyoming highway patrolman Rosey Wayman is transferred to the beautiful and imposing landscape of the Wind River Canyon, an area the troopers refer to as no-man's-land because of the lack of radio communication. She starts receiving -officer needs assistance- calls. The problem? They're coming from Bobby Womack, a legendary Arapaho patrolman who met a fiery death in the canyon almost a half-century ago. With an investigation that spans this world and the next, Sheriff Walt Longmire and Henry Standing Bear take on a case that pits them against a legend: The Highwayman.

 

 

 

 

Thursday, May 18 / 6 p.m. | The World War II At Night Group will discuss Islands of Destiny: The Solomons Campaign and the Eclipse of the Rising Sun by John Prados (New American Library, $17.00). The Battle of Midway is traditionally held as the point when Allied forces gained advantage over the Japanese. In Islands of Destiny, Prados points out that the Japanese forces quickly regained strength after Midway and continued their assault undaunted. Taking this surprising fact as the start of his inquiry, he began to investigate how and when the Pacific tide turned in the Allies' favor. Using archives of WWII intelligence reports from both sides, Prados offers up a compelling reassessment of the true turning in the Pacific: not Midway, but the fight for the Solomon Islands. Combat in the Solomons saw a series of surface naval battles, including one of the key battleship-versus-battleship actions of the war; two major carrier actions; daily air duels, including the aerial ambush in which perished the famous Japanese naval commander Admiral Yamamoto Isoroku; and many other hair-raising exploits. Commencing with the Allied invasion of Guadalcanal, Prados shows how and why the Allies beat Japan on the sea, in the air, and in the jungles. 

 

 

 

Thursday, May 18 / 6:30 p.m. | The As the Worm Turns Book Group will meet at the Market Basket and discuss World, Chase Me Down BY Andrew Hilleman (Penguin, $16.00). Once the most wanted man in America, Pat Crowe is a forgotten folk hero who captivated the nation as an outlaw for economic justice. World, Chase Me Down resurrects him, telling the electrifying story of the first great crime of the last century: how in 1900 the out-of-work former butcher kidnapped the teenage son of Omaha’s wealthiest meatpacking tycoon for a ransom of $25,000 in gold, and then burgled, safe-cracked, and bond-jumped his way across the country and beyond, inciting a manhunt that was dubbed the thrill of the nation and a showdown in the court of public opinion between the haves and have-nots all the while plotting a return to the woman he never stopped loving. The author will facilitate the discussion. 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, May 20 / 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.| Turn the Page Community Book Drive - Drop off new or gently used books at The Bookworm parking lot in Loveland Centre. The books you give will benefit Completely Kids, Kids Can Community Center, and Lutheran Family Services.

 

 

Saturday, May 20 | Concierge Marketing Author Open House – details pending

 

 

Sunday, May 21 / 11 a.m.  | The Books and Bagels book group will discuss Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng (Penguin, $16.00). Lydia is the favorite child of Marilyn and James Lee; their middle daughter, a girl who inherited her mother's bright blue eyes and her father's jet-black hair. Her parents are determined that Lydia will fulfill the dreams they were unable to pursue-in Marilyn's case that her daughter become a doctor rather than a homemaker, in James's case that Lydia be popular at school, a girl with a busy social life and the center of every party. When Lydia's body is found in the local lake, the delicate balancing act that has been keeping the Lee family together tumbles into chaos, forcing them to confront the long-kept secrets that have been slowly pulling them apart. James, consumed by guilt, sets out on a reckless path that may destroy his marriage. Marilyn, devastated and vengeful, is determined to find a responsible party, no matter what the cost. Lydia's older brother, Nathan, is certain that the neighborhood bad boy Jack is somehow involved. But it's the youngest of the family-Hannah-who observes far more than anyone realizes and who may be the only one who knows the truth about what happened. 

 

 

 

Sunday, May 21 / 1 p.m. | Casey Pycior will sign The Spoils: Stories (Northern Illinois University Press, $15.95). Deep in the Midwest, the characters in The Spoils are drowning under the weight of masculinity, paralyzed in the grip of things left unsaid. These men are broken and breaking, struggling to reckon with the decisions they've made and those they have yet to face. The stories in this powerful collection explore how men perform, in their jobs and personal lives, and investigate the gray area between doing what's best for oneself and acting a part to make others happy. In a world where the line between right and wrong is constantly shifting, some struggle to do the right thing, while others eschew the line altogether and deal with the sometimes violent repercussions. The Spoils examines these difficult choices and will appeal to readers of literary fiction and short stories. 

 

 

 

 

Sunday, May 21 / 1 p.m. | Keith Lesmeister will sign We Could've Been Happy Here ($15.00). In his short fiction, Keith Lesmeister plows out a distinctive vision of the contemporary Midwest. A recovering addict chases down a herd of runaway cows with a girl the same age as his estranged daughter. A middle-aged couple rediscovers their love for one another through the unlikely circumstance of robbing a bank. A drunken grandmother goads her grandson into bartering his leftover booze for a kayak. The daughter of a deployed soldier wages a bloody war on the rabbits ravaging her family's farm. These stories peer into the lives of those at the margins-the broken, the resigned, the misunderstood. At turns hopeful and humorous, tender and tragic, We Could've Been Happy Here illuminates how we are shaped and buoyed by our intimate connections with others--both those close to us, and those we hardly know. 

 

 

 

 

Monday, May 22 / 2 p.m. | The World War II Book Group will discuss Armageddon: A Novel of Berlin by Leon Uris (open Road, $19.99). Captain Sean O Sullivan distinguishes himself as a courageous soldier in the closing days of World War II, but what comes next tests his deepest reserves of strength and conviction. Sent to oversee the rebuilding of Berlin, O Sullivan is exposed to the horrific truths of the Holocaust, a shattered and defeated society, and the new threat of Soviet power as the Iron Curtain begins to shadow the city. When Soviet forces blockade Berlin and the airlift begins, O Sullivan is faced with profound moral dilemmas in an increasingly complicated world. Armageddon is one of the great fictional portrayals of Europe in the earliest days of the Cold War. 

 

 

 

 

Monday, May 22 / 2 p.m. | The Books To Die For  Group will discuss The Ghost of Blackwood Hall by Carolyn Keene (Grosset & Dunlap, $8.99). When Mrs. Putney seeks Nancy Drew’s help in recovering her stolen jewelry, the search for the thieves takes the teen-age detective and her friends Bess and George to the colorful French Quarter of New Orleans. But the quest is hampered by the strange behavior of Mrs. Putney, and two young women who are being victimized by so-called spirits. How can Nancy fight these unseen perpetrators of a cruel hoax? And how can she help the gullible victims when the spirits warn them not to have anything to do with Nancy? 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, May 23 / 6:30 p.m. | The Crime Through Time Book Group will discuss The Magistrates of Hell by Barbara Hambly (Severn House, $17.95). James Asher finds himself once more in alliance with vampire Don Simon Ysidro, as their investigations takes them to far-off Peking . . . October, 1912. James Asher, his wife Lydia, and the old occultist and vampire-hunter Dr. Solomon Karlebach have journeyed to the new-born Republic of China to investigate the rumour that the mindless Undead - the Others that even the vampires fear - have begun to multiply in the caverns of the hills west of Peking. Alongside his old vampire partner, Don Simon Ysidro, Asher embarks on a sinister hunt, while somewhere in the city's cold gray labyrinth lurk the Peking vampires, known as the Magistrates of Hell - with an agenda of their own . . .

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, May 24 / 6 p.m. | The Mysterious Readers Book Group will discuss The Blood Promise by Mark Pryor (Seventh Street Books, $15.95).  In post-Revolution Paris, an old man signs a letter in blood, then hides it in a secret compartment in a sailor's chest. A messenger arrives to transport the chest and its hidden contents, but then the plague strikes and an untimely death changes history. Two hundred years later, Hugo Marston is safeguarding an unpredictable but popular senator who is in Paris negotiating a France/U.S. dispute. The talks, held at a country chateau, collapse when the senator accuses someone of breaking into his room. Theft becomes the least of Hugo's concerns when someone discovers the secrets hidden deep inside the sailor's chest, and decides that the power and money they promise are worth killing for. But when the darkness of history is unleashed, even the most ruthless and cunning are powerless to control it. 

 

 

 

Thursday, May 25 / 6 p.m.| The Philosophy Book Discussion Group shall initially draw from British and Germanic thinkers. Using titles from the Very Short Introduction series, published by Oxford University Press, the initial chosen authors will follow chronologically from the Enlightenment Era to the first part of the 20thcentury.  Although the books are small and brief they are compacted with much detail requiring thoughtful examination.  The book for May discussion is Marx: A Very Short Introduction by Peter Singer (Oxford University Press, $11.95). Singer identifies the central vision that unifies Marx's thought, enabling us to grasp Marx's views as a whole. He sees him as a philosopher primarily concerned with human freedom, rather than as an economist or a social scientist.

 

 

 

 

Saturday, May 27 / 10 a.m. | The American History Book Club will discuss Sitting Bull: The Life and Times of an American Patriot by Robert Utley (Henry Holt, $22.00). Sitting Bull has long been one of the most fascinating and misunderstood figures in American history. Utley has forged a compelling portrait of Sitting Bull, presenting the Lakota perspective for the first time and rendering the most unbiased, historically accurate, and vivid portrait of the man to date. The Sitting Bull who emerges in this fast-paced narrative is a complex, towering figure: a great warrior whose skill and bravery in battle were unparalleled; the spiritual leader of his people; a dignified but ultimately tragically stubborn defender of the traditional ways against the steadfast and unwelcome encroachment of the white man. 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, June 3 / 10 a.m. | The Biography Discussion Group will discuss Sitting Bull: The Life and Times of an American Patriot by Robert Utley (Henry Holt, $22.00). Sitting Bull has long been one of the most fascinating and misunderstood figures in American history. Utley has forged a compelling portrait of Sitting Bull, presenting the Lakota perspective for the first time and rendering the most unbiased, historically accurate, and vivid portrait of the man to date. The Sitting Bull who emerges in this fast-paced narrative is a complex, towering figure: a great warrior whose skill and bravery in battle were unparalleled; the spiritual leader of his people; a dignified but ultimately tragically stubborn defender of the traditional ways against the steadfast and unwelcome encroachment of the white man. 

 

 

 

 

Monday, June 5 / 6:30 p.m. | The Lit Wits group will discuss Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe (Bantam, $5.95). Uncle Tom's Cabin was revolutionary in 1852 for its passionate indictment of slavery and for its presentation of Tom, "a man of humanity," as the first black hero in American fiction. Labeled racist and condescending by some contemporary critics, it remains a shocking, controversial, and powerful work -- exposing the attitudes of white nineteenth-century society toward "the peculiar institution" and documenting, in heartrending detail, the tragic breakup of black Kentucky families "sold down the river." An immediate international sensation, Uncle Tom's Cabin was translated into thirty-seven languages, and has never gone out of print: its political impact was immense, its emotional influence immeasurable.

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, June 6 / 6:30 p.m. | The Killing Time Book Group will discuss Superfluous Women by Carola Dunn (St. Martin’s, $16.99). In England in the late 1920s, The Honourable Daisy Dalrymple Fletcher goes to visit three old school friends, all unmarried, who have recently bought a house together. They are a part of the generation of "superfluous women" brought up expecting marriage and a family, but left without any prospects after more than 700,000 British men were killed in the Great War. Daisy and her husband Alec Detective Chief Inspector Alec Fletcher, of Scotland Yard go for a Sunday lunch with Daisy's friends, where one of the women mentions a wine cellar below their house, which remains curiously locked. When Alex opens the door, what greets them is not a cache of wine, but the stench of a long-dead body. Daisy's three friends are the most obvious suspects in a murder and her husband Alec is a witness, so he can't officially take over the investigation. Before the local detective, Superintendent Underwood, can officially bring charges against her friends, Daisy is determined to use all her resources and skills to solve the mystery behind this perplexing locked-room crime.

 

 

 

Wednesday, June 7 / Noon - 1 p.m. | What Are You Reading? book chat. Join us to chat about favorite reads, books that changed your life, or the book you just couldn’t put down.  No need to make reservations--just come and enjoy a little conversation about books.  Carol Lynch facilitates the discussions.

 

 

Thursday, June 8 / 6 p.m. | Amiable Adult Readers Discussing Books Almost Always Read by Kids (Aardbaark) will discuss Counting by 7’s by Sloan Goldberg (Puffin, $8.99). Willow Chance is a twelve-year-old genius, obsessed with nature and diagnosing medical conditions, who finds it comforting to count by 7s. It has never been easy for her to connect with anyone other than her adoptive parents, but that hasn’t kept her from leading a quietly happy life . . . until now. Suddenly Willow’s world is tragically changed when her parents both die in a car crash, leaving her alone in a baffling world. The triumph of this book is that it is not a tragedy. This extraordinarily odd, but extraordinarily endearing, girl manages to push through her grief. Her journey to find a fascinatingly diverse and fully believable surrogate family is a joy and a revelation to read. 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, June 9 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group shall initially draw from British and Germanic thinkers, meeting the second and fourth Thursdays.  A major focus will be to address philosophy as a personal or individual subject in relation to academic philosophers.  Using titles from the Very Short Introduction series, published by Oxford University Press, the initial chosen authors will follow chronologically from the Enlightenment Era to the first part of the 20thcentury.  Although the books are small and brief they are compacted with much detail requiring thoughtful examination.  The book for June discussion is Freud: A Very Short Introduction by Peter Singer (Oxford University Press, $11.95). Storr offers a lucid and objective look at Freud's major theories, evaluating whether they have stood the test of time, and in the process examines Freud himself in light of his own ideas. An excellent introduction to Freud's work, this book will appeal to all those broadly curious about psychoanalysis, psychology, and sociology. 

 

 

 

Saturday, June 10 / 3 p.m. | The Continental European Novel Book Group shall begin with classics from several countries dating back to the mid-19th century.  Following several classics we shall migrate into the 20thcentury, and then proceed country by country.  As the group grows and develops, the choices and purposes shall be to focus on major characters, plots, themes and assessment of the relevance for today’s reading audience.  The book for June discussion will be Death in Venice by Thomas Mann (Penguin Classics, $13.00).  Death in Venice tells about a ruinous quest for love and beauty amid degenerating splendor. Gustav von Aschenbach, a successful but lonely author, travels to the Queen of the Adriatic in search of an elusive spiritual fulfillment that turns into his erotic doom. 

 

 

 

 

Sunday, June 11 / 11 a.m. | The Books and Bagels book group will discuss Ms. Bixby's Last Day by John David Anderson (Walden Pond, $6.99). Everyone knows there are different kinds of teachers. The good ones. The not-so-good ones. The boring ones, the mean ones, the ones who try too hard. The ones you’ll never remember, and the ones you want to forget. But Ms. Bixby is none of these. She’s the sort of teacher who makes you feel like the indignity of school is worthwhile. Who makes the idea of growing up less terrifying. Who you never want to disappoint. What Ms. Bixby is, is one of a kind. Topher, Brand, and Steve know this better than anyone. And so when Ms. Bixby unexpectedly announces that she is very sick and won’t be able to finish the school year, they come up with a plan. Through the three very different stories they tell, we begin to understand just what Ms. Bixby means to Topher, Brand, and Steve and what they are willing to go to such great lengths to tell her. 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, June 14 / 6:30 p.m. | The Wednesday Bookworms will discuss Son of the Gamblin' Man: The Youth of an Artist by Mari Sandoz (Bison Books, $16.95). Sandoz  tells of the gambler and townsite promoter who founded Cozad, Nebraska, and of his family, particularly his younger son, who became a world-famous artist and teacher known as 'Robert Henri.' This tale is essentially Robert's story, the story of a sensitive talented boy growing up in the midst of frontier violence. But it is also the story of the ambitious promoter and of frontier people fighting hunger, cold, blizzards, drouths, grasshoppers, prairie fires, and ruthless cattlemen. 9780803258334

 

 

 

 

Thursday, June 15 / 6 p.m. | The World War II At Night Group and the As the Worm Turns Book Group will not meet in June.

 

 

Thursday, June 15 / 7:00 p.m. | David Sedaris will sign Theft by Finding: Diaries 1977-2002 (Little Brown, $28.00). It's no coincidence that the world's best writers tend to keep diaries. David Sedaris has recorded everything that has captured his attention--overheard comments, salacious gossip, soap opera plot twists, secrets confided by total strangers. These observations are the source code for his finest work, and with them he has honed his self-deprecation and learned to craft his cunning, surprising sentences. Now Sedaris shares his private writings with the world in Theft By Finding: Diaries 1977-2002. This is the first-person account of how a drug-abusing dropout with a weakness for the International House of Pancakes and a chronic inability to hold down a real job became one of the funniest people on the planet. 


Most diaries -- even the diaries of great writers -- are impossibly dull, because they generally write about their emotions, or their dreams, or their interior life. Sedaris's diaries are unique because they face outward. He doesn't tell us his feelings about the world, he shows us the world instead, and in so doing he shows us something deeper about himself. Written with a sharp eye and ear for the bizarre, the beautiful, and the uncomfortable, and with a generosity of spirit that even a misanthropic sense of humor can't fully disguise, Theft By Finding proves that Sedaris is one of our great modern observers. It's a potent reminder that there's no such thing as a boring day--when you're as perceptive and curious as Sedaris, adventure waits around every corner. 

Special signing rules will apply.

 

 

Monday, June 19 / 6:30 p.m. | The Droids and Dragons Book Club will discuss A Darker Shade of Magic by V. E. Schwab (Tor, $15.99). Kell is one of the last Travelers--magicians with a rare, coveted ability to travel between parallel universes--as such, he can choose where he lands. Officially, Kell is the Red Traveler, personal ambassador and adopted Prince of Red London, carrying the monthly correspondences between the royals of each London. Unofficially, Kell is a smuggler, servicing people willing to pay for even the smallest glimpses of a world they'll never see--a dangerous hobby. Fleeing into Grey London, Kell runs afoul of Delilah Bard, a cut-purse with lofty aspirations, who first robs him, then saves him from a dangerous enemy, and then forces him to spirit her to another world for a proper adventure. But perilous magic is afoot, and treachery lurks at every turn. To save all of the worlds, Kell and Lila will first need to stay alive--and that is proving trickier than they hoped. 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, June 20 / 6:30 p.m. | The International Intrigue Book Group will discuss Night Soldiers by Alan Furst (Random House, $16.00). Bulgaria, 1934. A young man is murdered by the local fascists. His brother, Khristo Stoianev, is recruited into the NKVD, the Soviet secret intelligence service, and sent to Spain to serve in its civil war. Warned that he is about to become a victim of Stalin’s purges, Khristo flees to Paris. Night Soldiers masterfully re-creates the European world of 1934 45: the struggle between Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia for Eastern Europe, the last desperate gaiety of the beau monde in 1937 Paris, and guerrilla operations with the French underground in 1944.  

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, June 22 / 2 p.m. | Introducing a new book club—Cather and Friends.  This group will read and discuss the work of Willa Cather, her contemporaries, and fellow Nebraskans.  Tea will be served, so bring your favorite cup. Please call 402-392-2877 to register or sign up at the store. The book for today’s discussion will be The Song of the Lark (Vintage, $13.95). In this powerful portrait of the self-making of an artist, Willa Cather created one of her most extraordinary heroines. Thea Kronborg, a minister's daughter in a provincial Colorado town, seems destined from childhood for a place in the wider world. But as her path to the world stage leads her ever farther from the humble town she can't forget and from the man she can't afford to love, Thea learns that her exceptional musical talent and fierce ambition are not enough. 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, June 22 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group shall initially draw from British and Germanic thinkers.  This split prompts a sharp distinction between science and theology/philosophy, as expressed in the division of ‘mind’ and ‘brain’.  A major focus will be to address philosophy as a personal or individual subject in relation to academic philosophers.  Using titles from the Very Short Introduction series, published by Oxford University Press, the initial chosen authors will follow chronologically from the Enlightenment Era to the first part of the 20thcentury.  Although the books are small and brief they are compacted with much detail requiring thoughtful examination.  The book for June discussion is Freud: A Very Short Introduction by Peter Singer (Oxford University Press, $11.95). Storr offers a lucid and objective look at Freud's major theories, evaluating whether they have stood the test of time, and in the process examines Freud himself in light of his own ideas. An excellent introduction to Freud's work, this book will appeal to all those broadly curious about psychoanalysis, psychology, and sociology. 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, June 24 / 10 a.m. | The American History Book Club will discuss Jacksonland: President Andrew Jackson, Cherokee Chief John Ross, and a Great American Land Grab by Steve Inskeep (Penguin, $17.00). Five decades after the Revolutionary War, the United States approached a constitutional crisis. One man we recognize: Andrew Jackson war hero, populist, and exemplar of the expanding South whose first major initiative as president instigated the massive expulsion of Native Americans known as the Trail of Tears. The other is a half-forgotten figure: John Ross a mixed-race Cherokee politician and diplomat who used the United States own legal system and democratic ideals to oppose Jackson. Representing one of the Five Civilized Tribes who had adopted the ways of white settlers, Ross championed the tribes cause all the way to the Supreme Court. Ross and his allies made their case in the media, committed civil disobedience, and benefited from the first mass political action by American women. Their struggle contained ominous overtures of later events like the Civil War and defined the political culture for much that followed. 

 

 

 

 

Sunday, June 25 / 1 p.m. | Kelly Sokol will sign The Unprotected (Skyhorse, $ 24.99).  Lara James has it all: a handsome husband, a high-powered job in advertising, and a beautiful home. Lara and Will are happy with their charmed, and childless, life, so no one is more surprised than Lara when she begins yearning for a baby. Will is thrilled, and she gets pregnant quickly, only to suffer a miscarriage. Endless rounds of hormone shots and IVF sessions takes a toll on Lara's body and her marriage, but after four years, she gets pregnant, and baby Auden is born. Lara quits her job to stay at home, but Auden is colicky, and her constant crying chafes at Lara's already raw nerves, while tenuous help from Will makes it worse, and Lara begins to spiral. Hanging on by a thread, it's only in her darkest moment that Lara will discover the true depths of her love and devotion--and what she's willing to face for the family she's so desperately sought. 

 

 

 

 

Monday, June 26 / 2 p.m. | The World War II Book Group will discuss When Paris Went Dark: The City of Light Under German Occupation, 1940-1944 by Ronald Rosbottom (Back Bay, $18.00). On June 14, 1940, German tanks entered a silent and nearly deserted Paris. Eight days later, France accepted a humiliating defeat and foreign occupation. Subsequently, an eerie sense of normalcy settled over the City of Light. Many Parisians keenly adapted themselves to the situation-even allied themselves with their Nazi overlords. At the same time, amidst this darkening gloom of German ruthlessness, deportations, shortages, and curfews, a resistance arose.  When Paris Went Dark evokes the detail of daily life in a city under occupation, and the brave people who fought against the darkness. 

 

 

 

 

Monday, June 26 / 2 p.m. | The Books To Die For  Group will discuss Mystic River by Dennis Lehane (Harper, $9.99). When they were children, Sean Devine, Jimmy Marcus, and Dave Boyle were friends. But then a strange car pulled up to their street. One boy got into the car, two did not, and something terrible happened something that ended their friendship and changed all three boys forever. Now, years later, murder has tied their lives together again. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, June 27 / 6:30 p.m. | The Crime Through Time Book Group will discuss Dreaming Spies: A Novel of Suspense Featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes by Laurie King (Bantam, $16.00).  Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes are on a cruising steamer leaving Bombay, bound for Kobe. Aboard the ship, intrigue stirs almost immediately. Holmes recognizes the famous clubman the Earl of Darley, whom he suspects of being an occasional blackmailer: not an unlikely career choice for a man richer in social connections than in pounds sterling. And then there’s the lithe, surprisingly fluent young Japanese woman who befriends Russell and quotes haiku. She agrees to tutor the couple in Japanese language and customs, but Russell can’t shake the feeling that Haruki Sato is not who she claims to be. From the glorious city of Tokyo to the cavernous library at Oxford, Russell and Holmes race to solve a mystery involving international extortion, espionage, and the shocking secrets that, if revealed, could spark revolution and topple an empire. 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, June 28 / 6 p.m.| The Mysterious Readers Book Group will discuss The Button Man by Mark Pryor (Seventh Street, $15.95). Former FBI profiler Hugo Marston has just become head of security at the U.S. Embassy in London. He's asked to protect a famous movie-star couple, Dayton Harper and Ginny Ferro, who, while filming a movie in rural England, killed a local man in a hit and run.  Before Hugo even meets them, he finds out that Ferro has disappeared, and her body has been found hanging from an oak tree in a London cemetery. Hours later a distraught Harper gives Hugo the slip, and Hugo has no idea where he's run off to. Taking cues from a secretive young lady named Merlyn, and with a Member of Parliament along for the chase, Hugo's search leads to a quaint English village. There, instead of finding Harper, more bodies turn up. Teaming with local detectives and then venturing dangerously out on his own, Hugo struggles to find connections between the victims. Is this the work of a serial killer--or something else entirely?               

 

Subscribe to The Bookworm Omaha RSS