Upcoming Events at The Bookworm

The author signings, in-house book clubs and other events shown below are free and open to the public.     

The Bookworm offers in-house book clubs that you can attend when the featured books fit your interests and schedule. Readers receive a 20% book club discount on the books selected for discussion. The Bookworm provides facilitators to help lead the discussions for many of the in-house book clubs. If you have suggestions for groups, or are willing to facilitate discussions, please let us know

 

Thursday, November 23 | The Bookworm will be closed in observance of Thanksgiving Day.

 

 

Saturday, November 25 | Small Business Saturday and Indies First. Indies First celebrates independent bookstores and local communities in conjunction with Small Business Saturday. Why buy books in your local independent bookstore?

  •  You may be about  to make a purchase you'll value for the rest of your life
  • You'll be shopping where you live
  • You'll be helping create local jobs
  • You might just find a book you never knew existed
  • You'll find great gifts for friends and family
  • You can talk to real people about books they know and love
  • You'll be part of your local book-loving community

And that’s just the beginning. Thank you for being a big supporter of small business and your neighborhood. 

 

 

 

Saturday, November 25 / 10 a.m. | The American History Book Club will discuss American Spring by Walter Borneman (Back Bay, $18.00). When we reflect on our nation's history, the American Revolution can feel almost like a foregone conclusion. In reality, the first weeks of the war were much more tenuous, and a fractured and ragtag group of colonial militias had to coalesce to have even the slimmest chance of toppling the mighty British Army. American Spring follows a fledgling nation from Paul Revere's little-known ride of December 1774 and the first shots fired on Lexington Green through the catastrophic Battle of Bunker Hill, culminating with a Virginian named George Washington taking command of colonial forces. Focusing on the colorful heroes John Hancock, Samuel Adams, Mercy Otis Warren, Benjamin Franklin, and Patrick Henry, and the ordinary Americans caught up in the revolution, Borneman uses newly available sources and research to tell the story of how a decade of discontent erupted into an armed rebellion that forged our nation.

 

 

 

Saturday, November 25 / 1 p.m. | Karen Goldner will sign Passing Semis in the Rain: A Tina Johnson Adventure ($11.99). When your life falls apart, and it wasn't much of a life to begin with, the simple response for Tina Johnson is to head for New Orleans. Except it's not so simple when you look like a federal witness and mob bookkeeper who knows where a drug cartel keeps its cash, and now you're being hunted by the feds, the mob, and the cartel. What begins as a road trip quickly turns into a dangerous race to prevent an assassination and collect the big payoff. Along the way Tina discovers romance, friendship, and her own strength. From New Orleans to Miami, this is not the kind of vacation that visitor bureaus advertise.

 

 

 

 

 

Monday, November 27 / 2 p.m. | The World War II Book Group will discuss When Books Went to War: The Stories That Helped Us Win World War II by Molly Manning (Mariner, $15.95). When America entered World War II in 1941, we faced an enemy that had banned and burned 100 million books. Outraged librarians launched a campaign to send free books to American troops and gathered 20 million hardcover donations. In 1943, the War Department and the publishing industry stepped in with an extraordinary program: 120 million small, lightweight paperbacks for troops to carry in their pockets and rucksacks in every theater of war. These Armed Services Editions were beloved by the troops and are still fondly remembered today. Soldiers read them while waiting to land at Normandy, in hellish trenches in the midst of battles, in field hospitals, and on long bombing flights. When Books Went to War is the inspiring story of the Armed Services Editions, and a treasure for history buffs and book lovers alike. 

 

 

 

Monday, November 27 / 6:30 p.m. | The Books To Die For Group will discuss I the Jury – My Gun Is Quick – Vengence is Mine by Mickey Spillane (New American Library, $18.00). In Mickey Spillane's classic detective novels, the action exploded in a bone-crunching catharsis. Men and women didn't make love, they collided. Tough brutes used their fists to drive home a message. Tougher broads used guile. And no one's morals were loftier than the gutter. No apologies. Little redemption. They rendered critics powerless, shocked intellectuals, inspired a new wave of pulp mayhem, and left the public hungry for more. Find out for yourself in this omnibus featuring the first three Mike Hammer novels by the living master of the hard-boiled mystery.

 

 

 

Tuesday, November 28 / 6:30 p.m. | The Crime Through Time Book Group will discuss Secrets in the Stones by Tessa Harris (Kensington, $15.00). Newly released from the notorious asylum known as Bedlam, Lady Lydia Farrell finds herself in an equally terrifying position--as a murder suspect--when she stumbles upon the mutilated body of Sir Montagu Malthus in his study at Boughton Hall. Meanwhile Dr. Thomas Silkstone has been injured in a duel with a man who may or may not have committed the grisly deed of which Lydia is accused. Despite his injury, Thomas hopes to clear his beloved's good name by conducting a postmortem on the victim. With a bit of detective work, he learns that Montagu's throat was slit by no ordinary blade, but a ceremonial Sikh dagger from India--a clue that may be connected to the fabled lost mines of Golconda.  From the mysterious disappearance of a cursed diamond buried with Lydia's dead husband, to the undying legend of a hidden treasure map, Thomas must follow a trail of foreign dignitaries, royal agents--and even more victims--to unveil the sinister and shocking secrets in the stones. 

 

 

 

Thursday, November 30 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group will continue their discussion of Habermas: A Very Short Introduction by Gordon Finlayson (Oxford University Press, $11.95). Jurgen Habermas is the most renowned living German philosopher. This book aims to give a clear and readable overview of his philosophical work. It analyzes both the theoretical underpinnings of Habermas's social theory, and its more concrete applications in the fields of ethics, politics, and law. Finally, it examines how Habermas's social and political theory informs his writing on real, current political and social problems. 

 

 

 

 

 Saturday, December 2 / 10 a.m. | The Biography Discussion Group will discuss The Gatekeeper: Missy Lehand, FDR, and the Untold Story of the Partnership That Defined a Presidency by Kathryn Smith (Touchstone, $16.99). Marguerite "Missy" LeHand was the right-hand woman to Franklin Delano Roosevelt--both personally and professionally--for more than twenty years. Although her official title as personal secretary was relatively humble, her power and influence were unparalleled. Everyone in the White House knew one truth: If you wanted access to Franklin, you had to get through Missy. She was one of his most trusted advisors, affording her a unique perspective on the president that no one else could claim, and she was deeply admired and respected by Eleanor Roosevelt. The Gatekeeper is a thoughtful, revealing story about a woman ahead of her time, the true weight of her responsibility, and the tumultuous era in which she lived--and a long overdue tribute to one of the most important female figures in American history. 

 

 

Sunday, December 3 / Noon to 3 p.m. | Pet lovers and their furry friends are invited for the 10th annual Santa Paws event for Hearts United for Animals. Santa and Mrs. Claus will be on hand to pose with pets. Elves from the University of Nebraska at Omaha will take a photo of the pet on Santa's lap, print the photo on site and turn it into a holiday card. All photos will also be emailed to pet owners. The fee is $25, with a $5 discount to $20 if you bring a donation of pet supplies.. All proceeds go directly to Hearts United for Animals, a no-kill shelter and animal welfare organization. Hearts United receives no government funding and exists solely on donations and the all-volunteer staff. The annual event is sponsored by the UNO chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA). For the last 10 years, students have planned the event and donated the proceeds to a local animal shelter or rescue groups.

 

Monday, December 4  | The Lit Wits group will not meet in December

 

 

Tuesday, December 5 / 6:30 p.m. | The Killing Time Book Group will discuss a trio by Mickey Spillane: I, the Jury, My Gun Is Quick, and Vengence Is Mine! (New American Library, $18.00). In Mickey Spillane's classic detective novels, the action exploded in a bone-crunching catharsis. Men and women didn't make love, they collided. Tough brutes used their fists to drive home a message. Tougher broads used guile. And no one's morals were loftier than the gutter. No apologies. Little redemption. They rendered critics powerless, shocked intellectuals, inspired a new wave of pulp mayhem, and left the public hungry for more. Find out for yourself in this omnibus featuring the first three Mike Hammer novels by the living master of the hard-boiled mystery. 

 

 

 

Wednesday, December 6 / Noon - 1 p.m.  | What Are You Reading? book chat. Join us to chat about favorite reads, books that changed your life, or the book you just couldn’t put down.  No need to make reservations--just come and enjoy a little conversation about books.  Carol Lynch facilitates the discussions.

 

 

Thursday, December 7 / 6:30 p.m. | The Notable Novellas group will discuss A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings by Charles Dickens (Penguin, $11.00). Since it was first published in 1843 A Christmas Carol has had an enduring influence on the way we think about the traditions of Christmas. Dickens's story of solitary miser Ebenezer Scrooge, who is taught the true meaning of Christmas by the three ghosts of Christmas past, present and future, has been adapted into countless film and stage versions since it was first published. Dickens's other Christmas writings collected here include 'The Story of the Goblins Who Stole a Sexton', the short story from The Pickwick Papers on which A Christmas Carol was based; The Haunted Man, a tale of a man tormented by painful memories; along with shorter pieces, some drawn from the 'Christmas Stories' that Dickens wrote annually for his weekly journals. In all of them Dickens celebrates the season as one of geniality, charity and remembrance. 

 

 

Saturday, December 9 / 3 p.m. | The Continental European Novel Group will discuss The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass (Mariner, $16.95). The Tin Drum is the story of thirty-year-old Oskar Matzerath, who has lived through the long Nazi nightmare and who, as the novel begins, is being held in a mental institution. Willfully stunting his growth at three feet for many years, wielding his tin drum and piercing scream as anarchistic weapons, he provides a profound yet hilarious perspective on both German history and the human condition in the modern world. Matzerath provides a profound yet hilarious perspective on both German history and the human condition in the modern world.

 

 

 

 

Sunday, December 10 / 11 a.m. | The Books and Bagels book group will discuss Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim by David Sedaris (Back Bay, $16.00). David Sedaris plays in the snow with his sisters. He goes on vacation with his family. He gets a job selling drinks. He attends his brother's wedding. He mops his sister's floor. He gives directions to a lost traveler. He eats a hamburger. He has his blood sugar tested. It all sounds so normal, doesn't it? In his newest collection of essays, David Sedaris lifts the corner of ordinary life, revealing the absurdity teeming below its surface. His world is alive with obscure desires and hidden motives -- a world where forgiveness is automatic and an argument can be the highest form of love. Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim is another unforgettable collection from one of the wittiest and most original writers at work today. 

 

 

Sunday, December 10 / 1 p.m. | Sarah Baker Hansen and Matthew Hansen will sign The Better Half – Nebraska’s Hidden Treasures (Omaha World-Herald, $29.95). Omaha World-Herald food critic Sarah Baker Hansen grew up in suburban Omaha. Husband Matthew, also a World-Herald columnist, came from Red Cloud, population 1,000. They’ve explored the state from border to border, and each has learned to love the part of the state they didn’t know: The Better Half. Come along on their travels as they share with each other little-known people, unexpected moments and memorable foods across Nebraska. At each stop, they discovered more of what the state has to offer.

 

 

 

Wednesday, December 13 / 6:30 p.m. | The Wednesday Bookworms will discuss Shanghai Girls by Lisa See (Random House, $16.00).  In 1937 Shanghai twenty-one-year-old Pearl Chin and her younger sister, May, are having the time of their lives. Both are beautiful, modern, and carefree until the day their father tells them that he has gambled away their wealth. To repay his debts, he must sell the girls as wives to suitors who have traveled from Los Angeles to find Chinese brides. As Japanese bombs fall on their beloved city, Pearl and May set out on the journey of a lifetime, from the Chinese countryside to the shores of America. Though inseparable best friends, the sisters also harbor petty jealousies and rivalries. They make terrible sacrifices, face impossible choices, and confront a devastating, life-changing secret, but through it all the two hold fast to who they are. 

 

 

Thursday, December 14 / 6 p.m. | Amiable Adult Readers Discussing Books Almost Always Read by Kids (Aardbaark) will meet to select books for discussion in 2018.

 

 

Thursday, December 14 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group will discuss Straw Dogs: Thoughts on Humans and Other Animals by John Gray (Farrar Straus Giroux, $17.00). Straw Dogs is an exciting, radical work of philosophy, which sets out to challenge our most cherished assumptions about what it means to be human. From Plato to Christianity, from the Enlightenment to Nietzsche and Marx, the Western tradition has been based on arrogant and erroneous beliefs about human beings and their place in the world. Philosophies such as liberalism and Marxism think of humankind as a species whose destiny is to transcend natural limits and conquer the Earth. John Gray argues that this belief in human difference is a dangerous illusion and explores how the world and human life look once humanism has been finally abandoned. The result is an exhilarating, sometimes disturbing book that leads the reader to question our deepest-held beliefs. 

 

 

Sunday, December 17 / 1 p.m. | Come home for the holidays with books that celebrate Omaha and Nebraska (and perhaps learn more about where we call home).

Eileen Wirth will sign Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium (History Press, $21.99). Long ranked as one of the top zoos in America and even the world, Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium's history has remained untold, until now. Beginning as little more than a menagerie, the zoo transformed into a spectacular attraction that now draws two million visitors per year. Supporters responded to innovative features such as the iconic desert dome, the new African Grasslands exhibit, the indoor jungle and the all-encompassing aquarium. More than just a showcase, the zoo also supports renowned wildlife conservation and research programs that help preserve endangered species ranging from coral reefs to tigers. Author Eileen Wirth celebrates the history and promising future of the landmark that continues to elicit great local pride. 

 

 

Gretchen Garrison will sign Detour Nebraska: Historic Destinations & Natural Wonders (History Press, $21.99). For many, Nebraska is the flat prairie seen from the interstate. Yet with the Sandhills, bluffs and river valleys, the state has an abundance of riches. The heritage of early settlers is evident. Fort Kearny and Chimney Rock were pioneer harbors. The Fur Trade Museum and the Homestead Monument of America tell of those who came to make a life. Carhenge is unique. The Joslyn Art Museum features world-class art, and the Nebraska National Forest is the largest hand-planted forest in the nation. Native Nebraskan Gretchen Garrison details the places and people that make the Cornhusker State unique. 

 

 

 

Kim Reiner will sign Lost Restaurants of Omaha (History Press, $21.99). Omaha is known for its beef, but the history of its most famous restaurants goes far beyond. The French Cafe was the place to go to celebrate. Piccolo Pete's, Mister C's and Bohemian Cafe helped shape neighborhoods in Little Italy, North Omaha and Little Bohemia. The tales of restaurateurs like the tragic Tolf Hanson; the ever-optimistic Ross Lorello; Anthony Oddo, once a resident at Boys Town; and Giuseppa Marcuzzo, a former bootlegger, also tell the story of the city. Restaurants played a prominent role as history unfolded in Omaha during prohibition, wartime rations, the fight for equal rights and westward expansion. Author Kim Reiner details the fascinating history behind Omaha's classic eateries. 

 

 

Mike Kelly will sign Uniquely Omaha: 101 Things to Know about the Big O by Mike Kelly (Omaha World-Herald, $29.95).  No place else is exactly like Omaha, a metropolitan area that’s cosmopolitan — soon to be 1 million people — and yet small enough that neighborhoods actually produce neighbors, most of whom care very much about each other. World-Herald columnist Michael Kelly weaves stories, facts, history and oddities into a paint-by-number — 101 — portrait of the city he knows so well. Celebrities and celebrations, inventions and innovations, artistry and attractions — add it all up, and it’s Uniquely Omaha.

 

 

 

December 18 - 20  | The Droids and Dragons Book Club,  the International Intrigue Book Group and the Mysterious Readers Book Group will not meet in December

 

 

Thursday, December 21 / 6 p.m. | The World War II At Night Group will discuss After D-Day: Operation Cobra and the Normandy Breakout by James Jay Cerafano (Stackpole, $19.95). After storming the beaches on D-Day, June 6, 1944, the Allied invasion of France bogged down in seven weeks of grueling attrition in Normandy. On July 25, U.S. divisions under Gen. Omar Bradley launched Operation Cobra, an attempt to break out of the hedgerows and begin a war of movement across France. Despite a disastrous start, with misdropped bombs killing hundreds of GIs, Cobra proved to be one of the most pivotal battles of World War II, successfully breaking the stalemate in Normandy and clearing a path into occupied France. 

 

 

 

Thursday, December 21 / 6:30 p.m. | The As the Worm Turns Book Group will discuss Pearl Harbor Christmas: A World At War, December 1941 by Stanley Weintraub (Da Capo, $14.00). Christmas 1941 came little more than two weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The shock was worldwide. While Americans attempted to go about celebrating as usual, the reality of the just-declared war was on everybody's mind. United States troops on Wake Island were battling a Japanese landing force and, in the Philippines, losing the fight to save Luzon. In Japan, the Pearl Harbor strike force returned to Hiroshima Bay and toasted its sweeping success. Across the Atlantic, much of Europe was frozen in grim Nazi occupation. Just three days before Christmas, Churchill surprised Roosevelt with an unprecedented trip to Washington, where they jointly lit the White House Christmas tree. As the two Allied leaders met to map out a winning wartime strategy, the most remarkable Christmas of the century played out across the globe. Pearl Harbor Christmas is a deeply moving and inspiring story about what it was like to live through a holiday season few would ever forget. Carl Wirth will lead the discussion. 

 

December 23 - 27  | The American History Book Club, the World War II Book Group,  the Books To Die For Group, the Crime Through Time Book Group, and the Mysterious Readers Book Group will not meet in December.

 

Sunday, December 24 | The Bookworm will close at 3:00 p.m. for Christmas Eve.

Monday, December 25 | The Bookworm will be closed in observance of Christmas Day.

 

 

Thursday, December 28 / 2 p.m. | Cather and Friends reads and discusses the work of Willa Cather, her contemporaries, and fellow Nebraskans.  Tea will be served, so bring your favorite cup. Please call 402-392-2877 to register or sign up at the store. The book for December discussion will be Journey into Christmas and Other Stories by Bess Streeter Aldrich (Bison, $19.95). The true meaning of Christmas emerges in these stories about reunited families, good fellowship, and restored faith. This is not to say that all is sugar candy. The mother in the title story faces a lonely Christmas in an empty house-but then something quite ordinary but miraculous happens. In "The Drum Goes Dead," a small-town bank cashier, a solid citizen and sterling friend, is dispirited by hard times until he discovers, through his own resources, that it is indeed a wonderful life. Here are nine other holiday stories, by turns dramatic, humorous, and inspirational. The closing piece recalls the author's childhood in Iowa.  

 

 

 

Thursday, December 28 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group will continue their discussion of Straw Dogs: Thoughts on Humans and Other Animals by John Gray (Farrar Straus Giroux, $17.00). Straw Dogs is an exciting, radical work of philosophy, which sets out to challenge our most cherished assumptions about what it means to be human. From Plato to Christianity, from the Enlightenment to Nietzsche and Marx, the Western tradition has been based on arrogant and erroneous beliefs about human beings and their place in the world. Philosophies such as liberalism and Marxism think of humankind as a species whose destiny is to transcend natural limits and conquer the Earth. John Gray argues that this belief in human difference is a dangerous illusion and explores how the world and human life look once humanism has been finally abandoned. The result is an exhilarating, sometimes disturbing book that leads the reader to question our deepest-held beliefs. 

 

Sunday, December 31 | The Bookworm will close at 3:00 p.m. for New Year’s Eve.

Monday, January 1 | The Bookworm will be closed in observance of New Year’s Day.

 

 

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