Upcoming Events at The Bookworm

The author signings, in-house book clubs and other events shown below are free and open to the public.     

The Bookworm offers in-house book clubs that you can attend when the featured books fit your interests and schedule. Readers receive a 20% book club discount on the books selected for discussion. The Bookworm provides facilitators to help lead the discussions for many of the in-house book clubs. If you have suggestions for groups, or are willing to facilitate discussions, please let us know

 

Jo Jo Siwa book release and photo opportunity event information

Time change: JoJo will be able to join us earlier. The photo line will now open at 4 p.m. and doors will open at 5 p.m.

SOLD OUT - We have reached the limit of 800 tickets sold to JoJo Siwa’s event - sorry but no more tickets can be sold. While capping the number of tickets is not ideal, we anticipate 800 ticket holders moving through the line to meet JoJo will take us well into the evening.  We want this to be a great event for JoJo and her fans. We greatly appreciate the overwhelming excitement and support for JoJo's event and thank you for your support and understanding.

Join us on Monday, October 9 at The Bookworm for a photo line/selfie event to celebrate the release of JoJo Siwa's Guide to the Sweet Life . We are excited for her to return home to Omaha and meet fans at The Bookworm.

This will be a ticketed event.  Your ticket includes a pre-signed book and admission to the photo line for a selfie with JoJo. JoJo will not be signing at the event.

Each fan who wishes to meet JoJo and have their photo taken with her must purchase a ticket. Parents/guardians, siblings, or other members of the party who do not care for a book or to meet JoJo do not need to purchase a ticket. Those without tickets will not proceed through the photo line themselves; only ticket-holders will enter the photo and book line.

Books purchased at other vendors will not be permitted.

Tickets must be purchased through Eventbrite. A printed copy of your ticket will be your admission to the photo line! The link to Eventbrite is here,

The line for the event will be first come, first served. The line for photos will open at 4 p.m. central time and doors will open at 5 p.m. There will be no lining up before 4 p.m.! Eventbrite tickets will be required to assume your spot in line.

Here's what you get with the purchase of a ticket:
* line admittance for ONE fan. 
* a photo of the ticket-holder with JoJo.
* a copy of the JoJo's Guide to the Sweet Life!, pre-signed and handed to the ticket-holder after their photo with JoJo.

Here's what you shouldn't expect with the purchase of a ticket:
* an autograph in a book you purchased elsewhere.
* a presentation or book talk from JoJo.
* personalization in the book.

Again, a printed copy of your ticket, not on your phone, will be your admission to the photo line. EACH MEMBER of your party that wishes to meet JoJo and have a picture taken with her MUST have a ticket. If you wish for a photo, but not a book, or a book but not a photo, you must still purchase a ticket through Eventbrite.

JoJo will use the fan's cell phone to take a selfie of the fan and JoJo together, so don't forget to bring your cell phone or camera. There will be no other posed photos with JoJo.

Tickets are $22.50 each ($18.99 for the book plus sales tax and Eventbrite fees)

Any further questions may be directed to The Bookworm at (402) 392-2877 or childrens@bookwormomaha.com

Please note this event follows wishes and guidelines set up directly by the publisher and the author. The Bookworm is not responsible for changes made by the author or publisher prior to or during the event.

Tickets are non-refundable. If you miss the event, in order to receive your book you will need to contact us within 30 days of the event.

 

 

Monday, September 25 / 2 p.m. | The World War II Book Group will discuss Operation Neptune: The D-Day Landings and the Allied Invasion of Europe by Craig Symonds (Oxford University Press, $16.95). The code name for the Normandy invasion in 1944 was Overlord, but everything that came before, including the landings themselves and the supply system that made it possible for the invaders to stay there, was code-named Neptune. Symonds now offers the story of this Olympian effort, involving transports, escorts, gunfire support ships, and landing craft of every possible size and function. The obstacles to success were many. In addition to divergent strategic views and cultural frictions, the Anglo-Americans had to overcome German U-boats, Russian impatience, fierce competition for insufficient shipping, training disasters, and a thousand other impediments, including logistical bottlenecks and disinformation schemes.  Symonds shows in this gripping account of D-Day that success depended mostly on the men themselves: the junior officers and enlisted men who drove the landing craft, cleared the mines, seized the beaches and assailed the bluffs behind them, securing the foothold for the eventual campaign to Berlin, and the end of the most terrible war in human history. 

 

 

 

Monday, September 25 / 6 p.m. | Ed Darack will sign The Final Mission of Extortion 17: Special Ops, Helicopter Support, Seal Team Six, and the Deadliest Day of the U.S. War in Afghanistan (Smithsonian Books, $24.95). On August 6, 2011, a U.S. Army CH-47D Chinook helicopter was shot down 40 miles southwest of Kabul. All 38 on board perished  in the single greatest moment of sacrifice for Americans in the war in Afghanistan. Those killed were some of the U.S.'s most highly trained and battle-honed commandos. In The Final Mission of Extortion 17, Ed Darack uncovers the truth behind this mysterious tragedy. His account of the brave pilots, crew, and passengers of Extortion 17 and the events of that fateful day is interwoven into a rich, complex narrative that also discusses modern joint combat operations, the history of the Afghan war to that date, U.S. helicopter use in Afghanistan, and the new and evolving military technologies and tactics being developed to mitigate such tragedies now and in the future.

 

 

 

Monday, September 25 / 6:30 p.m. | The Books To Die For  Group will discuss Strangers on a Train by Patricia Highsmith (Norton, $14.95). Guy Haines is a successful architect in the midst of a divorce, and Charles Anthony Bruno is a conniving psychopath who manipulates a chance encounter with Guy into a sadistic plot to swap murders. Some people are better off dead, says Bruno, like your wife and my father, for instance. As Bruno carries out his twisted plan, Guy becomes trapped in Patricia Highsmith’s perilous world, where under the right circumstances anyone is capable of murder. Strangers on a Train elicits the menace that lurks in familiar surroundings and the unsettling forces that tremble beneath the surface of everyday life.

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, September 26 / 6:30 p.m. | The Crime Through Time Book Group will discuss The House of the Vestals: The Investigations of Gordianus the Finder by Steven Saylor (Minotaur, $16.99). It is Ancient Rome, and Gordianus the Finder has a knack for finding trouble. Known to many as the one man in the ancient world who can both keep a secret and uncover one, Gordianus lays bare some of his most intriguing and compelling adventures. The House of the Vestals collects nine of the award-winning stories of Gordianus the Finder by author Steven Saylor. Filling in some of the gaps between novels, this delightful collection of unique and unforgetable mysteries is Saylor at his finest - revealing the intrigues in the secret history of Rome. 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, September 27 / 6 p.m. | A Banned Books Week panel discussion will be facilitated by Omaha Public librarian Nancy Chmiel with Lora Liebrandt, middle school librarian; Kim Dutiel, elementary teacher; Emily Wilson, youth worker and a parent/author yet to be named. The issue of censorship as it applies to schools and libraries is critical.  Books and other materials are sometimes challenged or removed from school libraries or classrooms as not appropriate for children of a specific age or group. Or librarians may sometimes avoid ordering certain titles altogether in order “to avoid trouble.” The panel of teachers, librarians and parents will address these issues and many others.  Many schools have policies already in place to deal with such challenges.  Come listen to the panel and bring up questions you may have about censorship in schools and libraries. 

 

 

 

Wednesday, September 27 / 6 p.m. | The Mysterious Readers Book Group will discuss Pardonable Lies by Jacqueline Winspear (Picador, $16.00). A deathbed plea from his wife leads Sir Cecil Lawton to seek the aid of Maisie Dobbs, psychologist and investigator. As Maisie soon learns, Agnes Lawton never accepted that her aviator son was killed in the Great War, a torment that led her not only to the edge of madness but to the doors of those who practice the dark arts and commune with the spirit world. In accepting the assignment, Maisie finds her spiritual strength tested, as well as her regard for her mentor, Maurice Blanche. The mission also brings her together once again with her college friend Priscilla Evernden, who served in France and who lost three brothers to the war--one of whom, it turns out, had an intriguing connection to the missing Ralph Lawton. 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, September 28 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group will continue their discussion of Nietzsche: A Very Short Introduction by Michael Tenner (Oxford University Press, $11.95). With his well-known idiosyncrasies and aphoristic style, Friedrich Nietzsche is always bracing and provocative, and temptingly easy to dip into. Michael Tanner's introduction to the philosopher's life and work examines the numerous ambiguities inherent in his writings and explodes many of the misconceptions that have grown in the hundred years since Nietzsche wrote "do not, above all, confound me with what I am not!" 

 

 

 

 

Friday, September 29 / 6 p.m. | Amy Mather from the Omaha Public Library will facilitate a Banned Books Week discussion about censorship as it concerns art, film, literature, and music for adults in today’s society. We have invited author Timothy Schaffert, Film Streams education director Diana Martinez, and Gallery 72 owner John Rogers to participate among many others to discuss how censorship affects their work.  Adult food and beverages will be served.

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, September 30 / 1 p.m. | Jon Kerstetter will sign Crossings: A Doctor-Soldier's Story (Crown, $27.00). Trained as an emergency physician, Kerstetter volunteered in war-torn Rwanda, Kosovo, and Bosnia, and joined the Army National Guard. His three tours in the Iraq War involved everything from saving soldiers' lives to organizing the joint U.S.-Iraqi forensics team tasked with identifying the bodies of Saddam Hussein's sons. But war was only the start of Kerstetter's struggle. The stroke he suffered upon returning from Iraq led to serious cognitive and physical disabilities. His years-long recovery meant overcoming the perceived limits of his body and mind and re-imagining his own capacity for renewal and change. It led him not only to writing as a vocation but to a deeper understanding of how healing means accepting a new identity, and how that acceptance must be fought for with as much tenacity as any battlefield victory.

 

 

 

Sunday, October 1 / 1 – 4 p.m. | Concierge Author Expo – Details to come

 

 

 

Monday, October 2 / 6 p.m. | The Bookworm and the Omaha Public Library will co-host Leigh Bardugo on her Midnight Tales Tour at the Millard Branch Library, 13214 Westwood Lane. We invite you to dress in costumes from the Grishaverse, with a prize for best costume awarded. Bardugo's newest book, The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic, will be available for sale at The Bookworm starting Tuesday, Sept. 26 and will be available at the event.  Its purchase guarantees the holder a place in line for the signing.  Leigh will only be personalizing The Language of Thorns but will sign up to five other books including Warbringer for each person in line. Books purchased from a vendor other than The Bookworm will not be signed. For more information, click here to access OPL website.

 

 

 

 

Monday, October 2 / 6:30 p.m. | The Lit Wits group will discuss Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut (Delta, $17.00).  Billy Pilgrim is the son of an American barber. He serves as a chaplain's assistant in World War II, is captured by the Germans, and he survives the largest massacre in European history--the fire bombing of Dresden. After the war Billy makes a great deal of money as an optometrist, and on his wedding night he is kidnapped by a flying saucer from the planet Tralfamadore.  So begins a modern classic by a master storyteller. 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, October 3 / 6:30 p.m. | The Killing Time Book Group will discuss The Ivy Tree by Mary Stewart (Chicago Review Press, $14.95). Mary Grey had come from Canada to the land of her forebears: Northumberland. As she savored the ordered, spare beauty of England's northern fells, the silence was shattered by the shout of a single name: Annabel! And there stood one of the angriest, most threatening young men Mary had ever seen. His name was Connor Winslow, and Mary quickly discovered that he thought she was his cousin--a girl supposedly dead these past eight years. Alive, she would be heiress to an inheritance Connor was determined to have for himself. 

 

 

 

Tuesday, October 3 / 6:30 p.m. | The Bookworm will sell books at a Council Bluffs Public Library event featuring Garth Stein. His book The Art of Racing in the Rain has sold more than 4 million copies in 35 languages, and spent more than three years on the New York Times bestseller list. For more information click here to visit the Council Bluffs Public Library website.

 

 

 

Wednesday, October 4 / Noon - 1 p.m. | What Are You Reading? book chat. Join us to chat about favorite reads, books that changed your life, or the book you just couldn’t put down.  No need to make reservations--just come and enjoy a little conversation about books.  Carol Lynch facilitates the discussions.

 

 

Wednesday, October 4 | The Bookworm will sell books at a Community Alliance event at the Holland Performing Arts Center featuring Darryl Strawberry, baseball legend and mental health advocate. For more information click here to visit the Community Alliance website.

 

 

 

Thursday, October 5 / 6:30 p.m. | The Notable Novellas group will discuss Billy Budd, Sailor by Herman Melville (Pocket Books, $4.95). Melville fashions a legal parable in which reason and intellect prove incapable of preserving innocence in the face of evil. For all those who feel themselves threatened by a hostile and inflexible environment, there is special significance in this haunting story of a handsome sailor who becomes a victim of man's intransigence. 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday, October 6 / 6 p.m. | Michael Brownlee will sign The Local Food Revolution: How Humanity Will Feed Itself in Uncertain Times (North Atlantic, $24.95). Demonstrating that humanity faces a global food crisis, Michael Brownlee issues a call for a revolutionary movement to localize the food supply. He lays out a practical guide for shaping the local or regional food system, providing a roadmap for righting the unsustainable industrialized food system. Written to inform, inspire, and empower anyone, this book provides a blueprint for economic action, with specific suggestions that make the process more conscious and deliberate. Stories and interviews illustrate how food localization is happening on the ground and in the field. Essays explore some of the challenging ethical, economic, and social dilemmas that might arise as the local food shift develops.

 

 

 

Saturday, October 7 / 10 a.m. | The Biography Discussion Group will discuss John Marshall: The Chief Justice That Saved the Nation by Harlow Unger (Da Capo, $17.99). Unger reveals how Virginia-born John Marshall emerged from the Revolutionary War's bloodiest battlefields to become one of the nation's most important Founding Fathers: America's greatest Chief Justice. With nine decisions that shocked the nation, John Marshall and his court saved American liberty by protecting individual rights and the rights of private business against tyranny by federal, state, and local government.  

 

 

 

 

Saturday, October 7 / 1 p.m. | Three poets from the University of Nebraska at Omaha will discuss and read from their works and sign copies for those who buy their books:

Adrian Koesters will discuss, read from, and sign Three Days with the Long Moon ($16.00). The long moon that Adrian Koesters invokes in her powerful second collection comprises an abiding theme of control and the allure of losing it. . Speaking through characters who wear the nuns habit or the invisibility of middle age, these poems voice an insatiable hunger for the forbidden. 

 

Crystal Spring Gibbins will discuss, read from, and sign Now/Here (Holy Cow, $16.00). Now/Here focuses on the diversity and power of the natural environment, examining the tensions and oppositions that exist within climate, land, time, and change. Rather than focusing on the quiet and idyllic beauty of the rural, many poems describe the harshness and hardships of the extreme and highly versatile landscape and weather. 

 

Michelle Menting will discuss, read from, and sign Leaves Surface Like Skin. Michelle Menting articulates gorgeous, strange visions of nature inflected by human interference. These poems teem with litany, landscape, literal and figurative image; an awareness of mortality hovers, not so much afterlife as underlife.  Menting has a gift for moody and luminous phrasing. There’s magic to a collection that does such heavy lifting with a light touch. 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday, October 8 / 11 a.m. | The Books and Bagels book group will continue their discussion of The Winds of War by Herman Wouk (Back Bay, $17.00). Herman Wouk's sweeping epic of World War II, which begins with The Winds of War and continues in War and Remembrance, stands as the crowning achievement of one of America's most celebrated storytellers. Like no other books about the war, Wouk's spellbinding narrative captures the tide of global events-and all the drama, romance, heroism, and tragedy of World War II-as it immerses us in the lives of a single American family drawn into the very center of the war's maelstrom. 

 

 

 

 

Sunday, October 8 / 1 p.m. | William Kent Krueger will sign Sulfur Springs (Atria, $26.00). Former sheriff Cork O'Connor’s second wife, Rainy Bisonette, a Native American healer, retrieves a disturbing voicemail from her son Peter, who's been living in Arizona. Peter has turned his troubled life around, kicking his drug habit and using the lessons he learned to become a substance abuse counselor. His garbled message, however, seems to indicate that he has killed someone named Rodriguez. Cork and Rainy race to Arizona, where they're stunned to learn that Peter left his job more than a year earlier. As they search for Peter, Cork becomes increasingly uneasy about his growing sense that Rainy is hiding something significant from him. Sulfur Springs features Krueger's signature talent of creating strong characters, building drama and conflict, braiding in Indian legend and spirituality, and spinning a good yarn.  

 

 

 

Monday, October 9 / 5 p.m. | SOLD OUT JoJo Siwa will have a photo opportunity event to celebrate the release of her book, Jojo's Guide to the Sweet Life: #Peaceouthaterz (Abrams, $18.99). This is the next generation's version of a real life Cinderella story: Nebraska girl becomes Hollywood's belle of the ball, thanks to her spunky attitude and creative drive. Through the lens of JoJo's personal experience and playful voice, she digs into themes such as finding your passion, keeping strong in the face of adversity, appreciating your individualism, the importance of being loyal, and never giving up. Most of all, JoJo's story is meant to inspire young girls to find the courage and confidence to go after their dreams.

This will be a ticketed event, with the ticket gaining you a pre-signed book and admission to the photo line for a selfie with JoJo. Each fan who wishes to meet JoJo and have their photo taken with her must purchase a ticket. How to obtain a ticket and the special conditions that apply to this event are posted above. 

SOLD OUT - We have reached the limit of 800 tickets sold to JoJo Siwa’s event - sorry but no more tickets can be sold. While capping the number of tickets is not ideal, we anticipate 800 ticket holders moving through the line to meet JoJo will take us well into the evening.  We want this to be a great event for JoJo and her fans. We greatly appreciate the overwhelming excitement and support for JoJo's event and thank you for your support and understanding.

TIME CHANGE - JoJo will be able to join us earlier. The photo line will now open at 4 p.m. central time and doors will open at 5 p.m.

 

 

Wednesday, October 11 / 6:30 p.m. | The Wednesday Bookworms will discuss People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks (Penguin, $16.00). In 1996, Hanna Heath, an Australian rare-book expert, is offered the job of a lifetime: analysis and conservation of the famous Sarajevo Haggadah, which was rescued during the Bosnian war. Priceless and beautiful, the book is one of the earliest Jewish volumes ever to be illuminated with images. When Hanna discovers a series of tiny artifacts in the book's ancient binding, she begins to unlock its mysteries, tracing the book's journey from its salvation back to its creation. In Bosnia during WW II, a Muslim risks his life to protect the book from the Nazis. In the hedonistic salons of Vienna, the book becomes a pawn in a struggle against the city's rising anti-Semitism. In Inquisition-era Venice, a Catholic priest saves it. Hanna's investigation unexpectedly plunges her into the intrigues of art forgers and ultra-nationalist fanatics. 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, October 12 / 6 p.m. | Amiable Adult Readers Discussing Books Almost Always Read by Kids (Aardbaark) will discuss Bone Gap by Laura Ruby (Harperteen, $9.99). Everyone knows Bone Gap is full of gaps. So when young, beautiful Roza went missing, the people of Bone Gap weren't surprised. But Finn knows what really happened to Roza. He knows she was kidnapped by a dangerous man whose face he cannot remember. As we follow the stories of Finn, Roza, and the people of Bone Gap, author Laura Ruby weaves a tale of the ways in which the face the world sees is never the sum of who we are.

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, October 12 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group will use titles from the Very Short Introduction series to follow from the Enlightenment Era to the first part of the 20thcentury.  Although the books are brief they are compacted with much detail requiring thoughtful examination.  The book for October discussion is Wittgenstein: A Very Short Introduction by A. C. Grayling (Oxford University Press, $11.95). Ludwig Wittgenstein was an extraordinarily original thinker, whose influence on twentieth-century thinking far outside the bounds of philosophy alone. In this engaging Introduction, A.C. Grayling makes Wittgenstein's thought accessible to the general reader by explaining the nature and impact of Wittgenstein's views. He describes both his early and later philosophy, the differences and connections between them, and gives a fresh assessment of Wittgenstein's continuing influence on contemporary thought.

 

 

 

Saturday, October 14 / 1 p.m. | S J Sindu will sign Marriage of a Thousand Lies (Soho, $25.00). Lakshmi, called Lucky, is a lesbian married to a gay Indian man. The child of immigrants from Sri Lanka, Lucky is caught in a double bind: Does she acquiesce or be true to herself? She wants to please her traditional family, especially her mother and grandmother, who want her to live the conventional life of a good brown daughter. Her feelings are further complicated when she learns that her first love, Nisha, is about to get married to someone she doesn't love. When Lucky's grandmother is injured in a fall, Lucky returns to her mother's home to be her grandmother's caretaker, and to confront her present and future. Lucky, an outsider no matter what choices she makes, is pushed to the breaking point. Marriage of a Thousand Lies offers a moving exploration of friendship, family, and love, shot through with humor and loss.  

 

 

 

Saturday, October 14 / 3 p.m. | The Continental European Novel Group’s book for October discussion will be The Vagabond by Colette (Farrar Straus Giroux, $15.00). Thirty-three years-old and recently divorced, Renee Nere has begun a new life on her own, supporting herself as a music-hall artist. Maxime, a rich and idle bachelor, intrudes on her independent existence and offers his love and the comforts of marriage. A provincial tour puts distance between them and enables Renee, in a moving series of letters and meditations, to resolve alone the struggle between her need to be loved and her need to have a life and work of her own. 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday, October 16 / 6:30 p.m. | The Droids and Dragons Book Club will discuss Revenger by Alastair Reynolds (Orbit, $15.99). The galaxy has seen great empires rise and fall. Planets have shattered and been remade. Amongst the ruins of alien civilisations, building our own from the rubble, humanity still thrives. And there are vast fortunes to be made, if you know where to find them. Captain Rackamore and his crew do. It's their business to find the tiny, enigmatic worlds which have been hidden away, booby-trapped, surrounded with layers of protection--and to crack them open for the ancient relics and barely-remembered technologies inside. But while they ply their risky trade with integrity, not everyone is so scrupulous. 

 

 

 


Tuesday, October 17 / 6:00 p.m. | Alan Wilkinson will sign Cody, the Medicine Man and Me.  Ray West is a middle-aged British university lecturer who reluctantly embarks on a field-trip in the USA that transforms into the ultimate voyage of personal discovery. Ray trails across Utah, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado and New Mexico in an attempt to track down his long-lost twin brother and establish the truth about his baffling family history. Old sibling rivalries resurface and a showdown brews - but ultimately only one of the brothers can ride off into the sunset. Alan Wilkerson explains why he's back in Nebraska for his sixteenth visit: "I fell in love with the place as soon as I crossed the river from Missouri. The more I saw, the more I wanted to know. I became fascinated with the writings of Willa Cather, then Mari Sandoz, and the landscapes that inspired them." 

 

 

 

Tuesday, October 17 / 6:30 p.m.  | The International Intrigue Book Group will discuss Raven Black by Ann Cleeves (Thomas Dunne, $16.99). Raven Black begins on New Year's Eve with a lonely outcast named Magnus Tait, who stays home waiting for visitors who never come. But the next morning the body of a murdered teenage girl is discovered nearby, and suspicion falls on Magnus. Inspector Jimmy Perez enters an investigative maze that leads deeper into the past of the Shetland Islands than anyone wants to go. 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, October 18 / 6:00 p.m. | Publisher Book Talk featuring reading selections for your personal enjoyment as well as gift ideas for the holidays.  Are you interested in finding a title for book club but don’t know where to start?  Maybe you’re interested in a good vacation read.  Or just possibly you’d like to find a book that you really love.  Join Penguin Random House representatives Bridget Piekarz, Jason Goble and Stefan Moorehead as they suggest a variety of titles for your consideration.   Feel free to bring something to eat or drink …. and don’t forget your pen!

 

 

 

Thursday, October 19 / 6 p.m. | The World War II At Night Group will discuss Stalingrad: The City That Defeated the Third Reich by Jochen Hellbeck (Public Affairs, $18.99). The turning point of World War II came at Stalingrad. Hitler's soldiers stormed the city in September 1942 in a bid to complete the conquest of Europe. After months of bitter fighting, 100,000 surviving Germans, huddled in the ruined city, surrendered to Soviet troops. During the battle and shortly after its conclusion, Red Army commanders and soldiers, party officials and workers spoke with a team of historians from Moscow to record their conversations. The tapestry of their voices provides groundbreaking insights into the thoughts and feelings of Soviet citizens during wartime. These testimonials were so harrowing and candid that the Kremlin forbade their publication. Revealed here in English, they humanize the Soviet defenders and allow Jochen Hellbeck, in Stalingrad, to present a definitive new portrait of the most fateful battle of World War II. 

 

 

 

Thursday, October 19 / 6:30 p.m. | The As the Worm Turns Book Group will discuss You Will Not Have My Hate by Antoine Leiris (Penguin, $23.00). On November 13, 2015, Antoine Leiris's wife, Helene Muyal-Leiris, was killed by terrorists while attending a rock concert at the Bataclan Theater in Paris, in the deadliest attack on France since World War II. Three days later, Leiris wrote an open letter addressed directly to his wife's killers, which he posted on Facebook. He refused to be cowed or to let his seventeen-month-old son's life be defined by Helene's murder ... Now Leiris tells the full story of his grief and struggle. Lee Myers will lead the discussion. 

 

 

 

 

Friday, October 20 / 6 p.m. | Lydia Kang will sign Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything (Workman, $22.95). Looking back with fascination, horror, and not a little dash of dark, knowing humor, Quackery recounts the lively, at times unbelievable, history of medical misfires and malpractices. Ranging from the merely weird to the outright dangerous, here are dozens of outlandish, morbidly hilarious "treatments"--conceived by doctors and scientists, by spiritualists and snake oil salesmen (yes, they literally tried to sell snake oil) – that were predicated on a range of cluelessness, trial and error, and straight-up scams. With vintage illustrations, photographs, and advertisements throughout, Quackery seamlessly combines macabre humor with science and storytelling to reveal an important and disturbing side of the ever-evolving field of medicine. 

 

 

 

Sunday, October 22 / 1- 2 p.m. | Charles Peak and Twyla Hansen will read from their books, followed by a discussion with questions and answers, and then sign their works of poetry. 

The State Poet of Nebraska, Twyla Hansen’s most recent work is Rock-Tree-Bird ($16.00). From memories of the isolation and beauty of growing up on a farm, to a burgeoning awareness as a teenager of the economic and cultural forces waged against family farming, to coming to terms with the legacies of her parents after their passing, and, finally, arriving at an appreciation of nature and the environment wherever and whenever she finds it, Hansen offers poems that are alternately sad, sweet, funny, moving, human, and humane.

Charles Peek won the 2016 Nebraska Books Awards competition for poetry with Breezes on Their Way to Being Winds ($14.95). He’s also the author of Where We’ve Managed Somehow To Be ($12.00).

 

 

 

Monday, October 23 / 2 p.m. | The World War II Book Group will discuss Wahoo: The Patrols of America's Most Famous World War II Submarine by Richard O’Kane (Presidio, $19.00). The career of the USS Wahoo in sinking Japanese ships in the farthest reaches of the Empire is legendary in submarine circles. Christened three months after Pearl Harbor, Wahoo was commanded by the astonishing Dudley W. "Mush" Morton, whose originality and daring new techniques led to results unprecedented in naval history; among them, successful "down the throat" barrage against an attacking Japanese destroyer, voracious surface-running gun attacks, and the sinking of a four-ship convoy in one day. Wahoo took the war to Japan's front porch, and Morton became known as the Navy's most aggressive and successful sea raider. The full story is told by the person most qualified to tell it - her executive officer Richard O'Kane, who went on to become the leading submarine captain of the Second World War. 

 

 

 

 

Monday, October 23 / 6:30 p.m. | The Books To Die For  Group will discuss Friends of Eddie Coyle by George Higgins (Picador, $15.00). Higgins's seminal crime novel is a down-and-dirty tale of thieves, mobsters, and cops on the mean streets of Boston. When small-time gunrunner Eddie Coyle is convicted on a felony, he's looking at three years in the pen--that is, unless he sells out one of his big-fish clients to the DA. But which of the many hoods, gunmen, and executioners whom he calls his friends should he send up the river? Told almost entirely in crackling dialogue by a vivid cast of lowlifes and detectives, The Friends of Eddie Coyle is one of the greatest crime novels ever written. 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, October 24 / 6:30 p.m. | The Crime Through Time Book Group will discuss A Terrible Beauty: A Lady Emily Mystery by Tasha Alexander (Minotaur, $15.99). Lady Emily organizes a holiday in Greece but the pleasantries are brought to an abrupt halt when a man long believed dead greets the party at their island villa. Lord Philip Ashton, Colin's childhood best friend and Emily's first husband, has returned. But can Philip really be who he claims, even if he has the scars and stories to prove it? Where has he been for all this time? And will his undying love for Emily drive him to claim what's his? Intrigue mounts as Philip reveals that he has been plagued for the past few years by an illegal antiques trader who believes he is in possession of a piece of Achilles' helmet, a priceless relic that was stolen from him moments after he unearthed it on an archaeological dig. 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, October 25 / 6 p.m. | The Mysterious Readers Book Group will discuss Messenger of Truth by Jacqueline Winspear (Picador, $16.00). London, 1931. The night before an exhibition of his artwork opens at a famed Mayfair gallery, the controversial artist Nick Bassington-Hope falls to his death. The police rule it an accident, but Nick's twin sister, Georgina, a wartime journalist and an infamous figure in her own right, isn't convinced. When the authorities refuse to consider her theory that Nick was murdered, Georgina seeks out a fellow graduate from Girton College, Maisie Dobbs, psychologist and investigator, for help. Nick was a veteran of World War I, and before long the case leads Maisie to the desolate beaches of Dungeness in Kent, and into the sinister underbelly of the city's art world.

 

 

 

Thursday, October 26 / 2 p.m. | Cather and Friends reads and discusses the work of Willa Cather, her contemporaries, and fellow Nebraskans.  Tea will be served, so bring your favorite cup. Please call 402-392-2877 to register or sign up at the store. The book for October discussion will be My Antonia (Vintage, $10.00). Antonia Shimerda returns to Black Hawk, Nebraska, to make a fresh start after eloping with a railway conductor following the tragic death of her father. Accustomed to living in a sod house and toiling alongside the men in the fields, she is unprepared for the lecherous reaction her lush sensuality provokes when she moves to the city. Despite betrayal and crushing opposition, Antonia steadfastly pursues her quest for happiness -- a moving struggle that mirrors the quiet drama of the American landscape. 

 

 

 

Thursday, October 26 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group will continue their discussion of Wittgenstein: A Very Short Introduction by A. C. Grayling (Oxford University Press, $11.95). Ludwig Wittgenstein was an extraordinarily original thinker, whose influence on twentieth-century thinking far outside the bounds of philosophy alone. In this engaging Introduction, A.C. Grayling makes Wittgenstein's thought accessible to the general reader by explaining the nature and impact of Wittgenstein's views. He describes both his early and later philosophy, the differences and connections between them, and gives a fresh assessment of Wittgenstein's continuing influence on contemporary thought.

 

 

 

 

Saturday, October 28 / 10 a.m. | The American History Book Club will discuss Madison’s Gift: Five Partnerships That Built America by David Stewart (Simon & Schuster, $16.99). Short, plain, balding, neither soldier nor orator, low on charisma and high on intelligence, Madison cared more about achieving results than taking the credit. It was Madison who led the drive for the Constitutional Convention and pressed for an effective new government as his patron George Washington lent the effort legitimacy; Madison who wrote the Federalist Papers with Alexander Hamilton to secure the Constitution's ratification; Madison who corrected the greatest blunder of the Constitution by drafting and securing passage of the Bill of Rights with Washington's support; Madison who joined Thomas Jefferson to found the nation's first political party and move the nation toward broad democratic principles; Madison, with James Monroe, who guided the new nation through its first war in 1812, really its Second War of Independence; and it was Madison who handed the reins of government to the last of the Founders, Monroe. But it was his final partnership with Dolley that allowed Madison to escape his natural shyness and reach the greatest heights.

 

 

 

Sunday, October 29 / 1 p.m. | Benjamin Vogt will sign A New Garden Ethic: Cultivating Defiant Compassion for an Uncertain Future (New Society, $18.99). Benjamin Vogt addresses why we need a new garden ethic, and why we urgently need wildness in our daily lives, lives sequestered in buildings surrounded by monocultures of lawn and concrete that significantly harm our physical and mental health. He examines the psychological issues around climate change and mass extinction as a way to understand how we are short circuiting our response to global crises, especially by not growing native plants in our gardens. Simply put, environmentalism is not political, it's social justice for all species marginalized today and for those facing extinction tomorrow. By thinking deeply and honestly about our built landscapes, we can create a compassionate activism that connects us more profoundly to nature and to one another.

 

 

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