Upcoming Events at The Bookworm

The author signings, in-house book clubs and other events shown below are free and open to the public.     

The Bookworm offers in-house book clubs that you can attend when the featured books fit your interests and schedule. Readers receive a 20% book club discount on the books selected for discussion. The Bookworm provides facilitators to help lead the discussions for many of the in-house book clubs. If you have suggestions for groups, or are willing to facilitate discussions, please let us know

 

 

Thursday, July 20 / 6 p.m. | The World War II At Night Group will discuss The Dead and Those About To Die: The Big Red One at Omaha Beach by John McManus (Dutton, $16.00). 1st Division had fought from North Africa to Sicily, earning a reputation as stalwart warriors on the front lines and rabble-rousers in the rear. Yet on D-Day, these veterans melded with fresh-faced replacements to accomplish one of the most challenging and deadly missions ever. As the men hit the beach, their equipment was destroyed or washed away, soldiers were cut down by the dozens, and heroes emerged. Drawing on a rich array of new or recently unearthed sources, including interviews with veterans, this is the unforgettable story of the Big Red One's nineteen hours of hell--and their ultimate triumph--on June 6, 1944.

 

 

 

 

Thursday, July 20 / 6:30 p.m. | The As the Worm Turns Book Group will discuss The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson (Hachette, $16.00). After a long and eventful life, Allan Karlsson ends up in a nursing home, believing it to be his last stop.  So he decides to escape. He climbs out the window in his slippers and embarks on a hilarious and entirely unexpected journey, involving, among other surprises, a suitcase stuffed with cash, some unpleasant criminals, a friendly hot-dog stand operator, and an elephant (not to mention a death by elephant). It would be the adventure of a lifetime for anyone else, but Allan has a larger-than-life backstory: Not only has he witnessed some of the most important events of the twentieth century, but he played a key role in them. Starting out in munitions as a boy, he somehow finds himself involved in many of the key explosions of the twentieth century and travels the world, sharing meals and more with everyone from Stalin, Churchill, and Truman to Mao, Franco, and de Gaulle. Barry Combs will facilitate the discussion. 

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, July 22 / 10 a.m. | The American History Book Club will discuss The First Battle of Manassas: An End to Innocence, July 18-21, 1861 by John Hennessy (Stackpole, $19.95). On July 21, 1861, near a Virginia railroad junction twenty-five miles from Washington, D.C., the Union and Confederate armies clashed in the first major battle of the Civil War. Hennessy's classic is the premier tactical account of First Manassas/Bull Run. It combines narrative, analysis, and interpretation into a clear, easy-to-follow account of the battle's unfolding. It features commanders who would later become legendary, such as William T. Sherman and Thomas J. Jackson, who earned his "Stonewall" nickname at First Manassas. 

 

 

 

Sunday, July 23 / 1 p.m. | Meredith Ann Fuller will sign Quarry ($38.99). In Quincy, Massachusetts, a young girl of Finnish and Irish descent loses her father under traumatic circumstances and sets out to learn what happened to him. Intuitive, naïve, implacable, Rose learns to read landscapes of the natural world and the human heart. She confronts history and its suppression. But it will take personal risk and imaginative reach to understand that she is part of a much larger story of immigrants to America. With edgy ordinariness, Fuller’s narrative gift describes secrets and tragedies, slowly revealing the riskier mythic underbelly of every good story. Joan Anderson’s illustrations evoke the inspirited worlds of characters ranging across the United States and Finland. Resurrecting a lost 19th century tradition, Quarry is a stunningly illustrated novel for adult readers of our time.

 

 

Monday, July 24 / 2 p.m. | The World War II Book Group will discuss South from Corregidor by John Morrill ($11.95). This is the amazing true-life war story of Lt.-Comm. John Morrill and 18 crewmembers of the US Navy mine sweeper Quail (AM-15), who rather than surrender to the Japanese, sailed from Corregidor Island to eventual freedom in a 36-foot motor launch. The crew of the small boat successfully navigated more than 2000 miles in enemy-infested seas, and successfully reached the safety of Australia after 31 days at sea. 

 

 

 

Monday, July 24 / 6:30 p.m. | The Books To Die For  Group will discuss In Cold Blood: A True Account of a Multiple Murder and Its Consequences by Truman Capote (Vintage, $16.00).  On November 15, 1959, in the small town of Holcomb, Kansas, four members of the Clutter family were savagely murdered by blasts from a shotgun held a few inches from their faces. There was no apparent motive for the crime, and there were almost no clues. As Truman Capote reconstructs the murder and the investigation that led to the capture, trial, and execution of the killers, he generates both mesmerizing suspense and astonishing empathy. In Cold Blood is a work that transcends its moment, yielding poignant insights into the nature of American violence. 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, July 25 / 6:30 p.m. | The Crime Through Time Book Group will discuss Absolution by Murder by Peter Tremayne (Signet, $7.99). The King of Northumbria has requested the services of a wise counsel to decide the people's religious future. Among the select priests, elders, and scholars from Ireland and Rome is Sister Fidelma of Kildare. Trained as an advocate of the courts, she was expecting to rule on issues of law. Instead she was plunged into unholy murder. Dead was the Abbess Etain, a leading Celtic speaker, her throat slashed. With the counsel in an uproar and civil war threatening, the desperate king has turned to the sharp-witted Sister Fidelma for help. With the aide of her dear friend Brother Eadulf and her faith in the truth, she must act in haste before the killer strikes again.

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, July 26 / 6 p.m. | The Mysterious Readers Book Group will discuss Maise Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear (Soho, $15.95). Maisie Dobbs entered domestic service in 1910 at thirteen, working for Lady Rowan Compton. When her remarkable intelligence is discovered by her employer, Maisie becomes the pupil of Maurice Blanche, a learned friend of the Comptons. In 1929, following an apprenticeship with Blanche, Maisie hangs out her shingle: "M. Dobbs, trade and personal investigations." She soon becomes enmeshed in a mystery surrounding The Retreat, a reclusive community of wounded WWI veterans. At first, Maisie only suspects foul play, but she must act quickly when Lady Rowan's son decides to sign away his fortune and take refuge there. Maisie hurriedly investigates, uncovering a disturbing mystery, which, in an astonishing denouement, gives Maisie the courage to confront a ghost that has haunted her for years.

 

 

 

Thursday, July 27 / 6 p.m.| Conon Parks will sign Empty Bottle of Smoke ($14.99). This is the story of a man named Walter and his paranoid adventures in Seattle. When readers first meet Walter, he is convinced he is "being stalked like a little rabbit" and decides to flee. And what better destination than a "bunker of a building graced under the banner name of the New Museum of Hysteria and Indecision and the We B Art Gallery"? This is where the Manifesto Party, a leftist libertine crew resides and holds court. As increasingly strange characters and events are added to this simmering pot of madness, how it will all end is anyone's guess when the World Trade Organization sets upon Seattle and protests commence and the riots break out.

 

 

 

 

Thursday, July 27 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group shall address philosophy as a personal or individual subject in relation to academic philosophers.  Using titles from the Very Short Introduction series, published by Oxford University Press, the initial chosen authors will follow chronologically from the Enlightenment Era to the first part of the 20thcentury.  Although the books are small and brief they are compacted with much detail requiring thoughtful examination.  The book for June discussion is Freud: A Very Short Introduction by Anthony Storr. (Oxford University Press, $11.95). Storr offers a lucid and objective look at Freud's major theories, evaluating whether they have stood the test of time, and in the process examines Freud himself in light of his own ideas. An excellent introduction to Freud's work, this book will appeal to all those broadly curious about psychoanalysis, psychology, and sociology.

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, August 1 / 6:30 p.m. | The Killing Time Book Group will discuss Away in a Manger by Rhys Bowen (Minotaur, $15.99). It's Christmastime in 1905 New York City, and Molly Murphy Sullivan is looking forward to the approaching holidays. She has a family of her own now: she and Daniel have a baby son and twelve-year-old Bridie is living with them as their ward. As Molly and the children listen to carolers in the street, they hear a lovely voice, the voice of an angel, and see a beggar girl huddled in a doorway, singing "Away in a Manger." Bridie is touched by the girl's ragged clothes and wants to help her out if they can. They give her a quarter, only to watch a bigger boy take it from her. But Molly discovers the boy is the girl's older brother. They've come from England and their mother has disappeared, and they're living with an aunt who mistreats them terribly. Molly quickly realizes that these children are not the usual city waifs. They are well-spoken and clearly used to better things. As Molly looks for a way to help the children and for the answers to these questions, she gets drawn into an investigation that will take her up to the highest levels of New York society.

 

 

 

Wednesday, August 2 / Noon - 1 p.m. | What Are You Reading? book chat. Join us to chat about favorite reads, books that changed your life, or the book you just couldn’t put down. No need to make reservations--just come and enjoy a little conversation about books. Carol Lynch facilitates the discussions.

 

 

 

Saturday, August 5 / 10 a.m. | The Biography Discussion Group will discuss One Man Against the World: The Tragedy of Richard Nixon by Tim Weiner (St. Martin’s, $15.99). One Man Against the World paints a devastating portrait of a tortured yet brilliant man who led the country largely according to a deep-seated insecurity and distrust of not only his cabinet and congress, but the American population at large. Weiner illuminates how the Vietnam War and the Watergate controversy that brought about Nixon's demise were inextricably linked. From the hail of garbage and curses that awaited Nixon upon his arrival at the White House, when he became the president of a nation as deeply divided as it had been since the end of the Civil War, to the unprecedented action Nixon took against American citizens, who he considered as traitorous as the army of North Vietnam, to the infamous break-in and the tapes that bear remarkable record of the most intimate and damning conversations between the president and his confidantes, Weiner narrates the history of Nixon's anguished presidency in fascinating and fresh detail.

 

 

 

Sunday, August 6 / 1 p.m. | Ted Wheeler will sign Kings of Broken Things ($14.95). During the waning days of World War I, three lost souls find themselves adrift in Omaha at a time of unprecedented nationalism, xenophobia, and political corruption. Adolescent European refugee Karel Miihlstein's life is transformed after neighborhood boys discover his prodigious natural talent for baseball. Jake Strauss, a young man with a violent past and desperate for a second chance, is drawn into a criminal underworld. Evie Chambers, a kept woman, is trying to make ends meet and looking every which way to escape her cheerless existence. As wounded soldiers return from the front and black migrant workers move north in search of economic opportunity, the immigrant wards of Omaha become a tinderbox of racial resentment stoked by unscrupulous politicians. Punctuated by an unspeakable act of mob violence, the fates of Karel, Jake, and Evie will become inexorably entangled with the schemes of a ruthless political boss whose will to power knows no bounds.

 

 

 

Monday, August 7 / 6:30 p.m. | The Lit Wits group will discuss The Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain (Signet, $7.95). The Innocents Abroad is Mark Twain's irreverent and incisive commentary on nineteenth century Americans encountering the Old World. Come along for the ride as Twain and his unsuspecting travel companions visit the Azores, Tangiers, Paris, Rome, the Vatican, Genoa, Gibraltar, Odessa, Constantinople, Cairo, the Holy Land and other locales renowned in history. No person or place is safe from Twain's sharp wit as it impales both the conservative and the liberal, the Old World and the New. He uses these contrasts to -find out who we as Americans are, - notes Leslie A. Fiedler. But his travelogue demonstrates that, in our attempt to understand ourselves, we must first find out what we are not.

 

 

 

Wednesday, August 9 / 6:30 p.m. | The Wednesday Bookworms will discuss The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot (Broadway, $16.00). Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells taken without her knowledge in 1951 became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, and more. Henrietta's cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can't afford health insurance. This phenomenal New York Times bestseller tells a riveting story of the collision between ethics, race, and medicine; of scientific discovery and faith healing; and of a daughter consumed with questions about the mother she never knew.

 

 

 

Thursday, August 10 / 6 p.m. | Amiable Adult Readers Discussing Books Almost Always Read by Kids (Aardbaark) will discuss Cinder, volume #1 of the Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer (Square Fish, $9.99). Humans and androids crowd the raucous streets of New Beijing. A deadly plague ravages the population. From space, a ruthless lunar people watch, waiting to make their move. No one knows that Earth's fate hinges on one girl. Cinder, a gifted mechanic, is a cyborg. She's a second-class citizen with a mysterious past, reviled by her stepmother and blamed for her stepsister's illness. But when her life becomes intertwined with the handsome Prince Kai's, she suddenly finds herself at the center of an intergalactic struggle, and a forbidden attraction. Caught between duty and freedom, loyalty and betrayal, she must uncover secrets about her past in order to protect her world's future.

 

 

 

Thursday, August 10 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group shall initially draw from British and Germanic thinkers. Using titles from the Very Short Introduction series, published by Oxford University Press, the initial chosen authors will follow chronologically from the Enlightenment Era to the first part of the 20thcentury. Although the books are small and brief they are compacted with much detail requiring thoughtful examination. The book for August discussion is Schopenhauer: A Very Short Introduction by Christopher Janaway (Oxford University Press, $11.95). Schopenhauer is considered to be the most readable of German philosophers. This book gives a succinct explanation of his metaphysical system, concentrating on the original aspects of his thought, which inspired many artists and thinkers including Nietzsche, Wagner, Freud, and Wittgenstein. Schopenhauer's central notion is that of the will--a blind, irrational force that he uses to interpret both the human mind and the whole of nature. Seeing human behavior as that of a natural organism governed by the will to life, Schopenhauer developed radical insights concerning the unconscious and sexuality which influenced both psychologists and philosophers.

 

 

 

Sunday, August 13 / 11 a.m. | The Books and Bagels book group will discuss The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh (Ballantine, $16.00). The Victorian language of flowers was used to convey romantic expressions: honeysuckle for devotion, asters for patience, and red roses for love. But for Victoria Jones, it's been more useful in communicating mistrust and solitude. After a childhood spent in the foster-care system, she is unable to get close to anybody, and her only connection to the world is through flowers and their meanings. Now eighteen and emancipated from the system with nowhere to go, Victoria realizes she has a gift for helping others through the flowers she chooses for them. But an unexpected encounter with a mysterious stranger has her questioning what's been missing in her life. And when she's forced to confront a painful secret from her past, she must decide whether it's worth risking everything for a second chance at happiness.

 

 

 

Tuesday, August 15 / 6:30 p.m. | The International Intrigue Book Group will discuss Into Oblivion by Arnaldur Indridason (Picador, $16.00). Into Oblivion gives devoted fans another glimpse of Erlendur in his early days as a young, budding detective. Iceland, 1979. A woman swims in a remote, milky-blue lagoon. Steam rises from the water and as it clears, a body is revealed in the ghostly light. Miles away, a vast aircraft hangar rises behind the perimeter fence of the U.S. military base. A sickening thud is heard as a man's body falls from a high platform. Many years before, a schoolgirl went missing. The world has forgotten her. But Erlendur has not. Erlendur is a newly promoted detective. He is only starting out, but he is already deeply involved in his work.

 

 

 

Wednesday, August 16 / 6 p.m. | Ramona Scarborough will sign The Makeover ($7.99).  A glamorous makeover on a national TV show is the beginning of Amber Moffit's transformation. With the help of friends and family, she begins an internal makeover. Her quirky girlfriend, Chantal, talks her into joining Smart Hearts, a dating site. Naveen, an attractive Indian man from New York responds. Though Amber and Naveen have interests in common, their background, culture and religion are drastically different. There's a bigger obstacle. Naveen's parents have already arranged for him to marry Rani, an Indian bride. Rani's parents threaten to sue him for breach of promise.

 

 

 

Thursday, August 17 / 6 p.m. | The World War II At Night Group will discuss Strategic Deception in the Second World War by Michael Elliot Howard (Norton, $21.00). A volume in the British government's Official History of Intelligence in the Second World War, the book has been written by a master historian renowned for his narrative and analytical skills. Sir Michael Howard explains how the British were able to deceive the Germans about the strategic intentions of the Allies and make them greatly overestimate Allied resources. Here is the most authoritative account available of such classic deception operations as Operation Mincemeat, which preceded the invasion of Sicily; the nonexistent U.S. Army group that pinned down an entire German Army in the Pas de Calais until Montgomery's forces had achieved a secure foothold in Normandy; and the amazing trick played on the German intelligence authorities by the great double agent Garbo.

 

 

 

Thursday, August 17 / 6:30 p.m. | The As the Worm Turns Book Group will discuss One of Ours by Willa Cather (Vintage, $14.95). Claude Wheeler, the sensitive, aspiring protagonist of this beautifully modulated novel, resembles the youngest son of a peculiarly American fairy tale. His fortune is ready-made for him, but he refuses to settle for it. Alienated from his crass father and pious mother, all but rejected by a wife who reserves her ardor for missionary work, and dissatisfied with farming, Claude is an idealist without an ideal to cling to. It is only when his country enters the First World War that Claude finds what he has been searching for all his life. In One of Ours Willa Cather explores the destiny of a grandchild of the pioneers, a young Nebraskan whose yearnings impel him toward a frontier bloodier and more distant than the one that vanished before his birth. In doing so, she creates a canny and extraordinarily vital portrait of an American psyche at once skeptical and romantic, restless and heroic. Ellen Scott will lead the discussion.

 

 

 

Monday, August 21 / 6:30 p.m. | The Droids and Dragons Book Club will discuss Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel (Del Ray, $16.00). Rose is riding her new bike near her home in Deadwood, South Dakota, when she falls through the earth. She wakes up at the bottom of a square hole, its walls glowing with intricate carvings. But the firemen who come to save her peer down upon something even stranger: a little girl in the palm of a giant metal hand. Seventeen years later, the mystery of the bizarre artifact remains unsolved--its origins, architects, and purpose unknown. Rose Franklin is now a highly trained physicist leading a top secret team to crack the hand's code. And along with her colleagues, she is being interviewed by a nameless interrogator whose power and purview are as enigmatic as the provenance of the relic. What's clear is that Rose and her compatriots are on the edge of unraveling history's most perplexing discovery--and figuring out what it portends for humanity.

 

 

 

Tuesday, August 22 / 6:30 p.m. | The Crime Through Time Book Group will discuss A Shadowed Evil: A Medieval Mystery by Alys Clare (Severn House, $17.99). February, 1212. Sir Josse d'Acquin and Helewise are summoned to Southfire Hall, where Josse's elderly uncle, Hugh, lies dying, surrounded by his children. But the pair soon discovers that Hugh's ill health is not the only cause of distress in the house: for Hugh's son and heir, Herbert, has taken an unpleasant new wife, the widowed Lady Cyrille. Josse and Helewise are distracted by the discovery of an injured young man on the road outside on the evening of their arrival, but the longer they remain in the house, the more they feel that something is very wrong. What happened to Josse's cousin Aeleis, who no one speaks of? Where is Lady Cyrille's small son? And why do they both feel as if the house itself is alive - and threatened by approaching evil?

 

 

Wednesday, August 23 / 6 p.m. | The Mysterious Readers Book Group will discuss Birds of a Feather by Jacqueline Winspear (Soho, $15.95). Birds of a Feather finds psychologist and private investigator Maisie Dobbs on another dangerously intriguing adventure in London between the wars. It is the spring of 1930, and Maisie has been hired to find a runaway heiress. But what seems a simple case at the outset soon becomes increasingly complicated when three of the heiress s old friends are found dead. Is there a connection between the woman’s mysterious disappearance and the murders? Who would want to kill three seemingly respectable young women? As Maisie investigates, she discovers that the answers lie in the unforgettable agony of the Great War.

 

 

 

Thursday, August 24 / 6 p.m.| Cather and Friends reads and discusses the work of Willa Cather, her contemporaries, and fellow Nebraskans.  Tea will be served, so bring your favorite cup. Please call 402-392-2877 to register or sign up at the store. The book for August discussion will be One of Ours by Willa Cather (Vintage, $14.95). Claude Wheeler’s fortune is ready-made for him, but he refuses to settle for it. Alienated from his crass father and pious mother, all but rejected by a wife who reserves her ardor for missionary work, and dissatisfied with farming, Claude is an idealist without an ideal to cling to. It is only when his country enters the First World War that Claude finds what he has been searching for all his life. In One of Ours Cather creates a canny and extraordinarily vital portrait of an American psyche at once skeptical and romantic, restless and heroic.

 

 

 

Thursday, August 24 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group shall initially draw from British and Germanic thinkers. Using titles from the Very Short Introduction series, published by Oxford University Press, the initial chosen authors will follow chronologically from the Enlightenment Era to the first part of the 20thcentury. Although the books are small and brief they are compacted with much detail requiring thoughtful examination. The book for August discussion is Schopenhauer: A Very Short Introduction by Christopher Janaway (Oxford University Press, $11.95). Schopenhauer is considered to be the most readable of German philosophers. This book gives a succinct explanation of his metaphysical system, concentrating on the original aspects of his thought, which inspired many artists and thinkers including Nietzsche, Wagner, Freud, and Wittgenstein. Schopenhauer's central notion is that of the will--a blind, irrational force that he uses to interpret both the human mind and the whole of nature. Seeing human behavior as that of a natural organism governed by the will to life, Schopenhauer developed radical insights concerning the unconscious and sexuality which influenced both psychologists and philosophers.

 

 

 

Saturday, August 26 / 10 a.m. | The American History Book Club will discuss War of Two: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel That Stunned the Nation by John Sedgwick (Berkley, $17.00). Sedgwick explores the long-standing conflict between Founding Father Alexander Hamilton and Vice President Aaron Burr. Matching each other's ambition and skill as lawyers in New York, they later battled for power along political fault lines that would decide--and define--the future of the United States. A series of letters between Burr and Hamilton suggests the duel was fought over an unflattering comment made at a dinner party. But another letter, written by Hamilton the night before the event, provides critical insight into his true motivation. It was addressed to former Speaker of the House Theodore Sedgwick, a trusted friend of both men, and the author's own ancestor. John Sedgwick suggests that Hamilton saw Burr not merely as a personal rival but as a threat to the nation. It was a fear that would prove justified after Hamilton's death.

 

 

 

Monday, August 28 / 2 p.m. | The World War II Book Group will discuss Long Way Back to the River Kwai: A Harrowing True Story of Survival in World War II by Loet Vilmans (Arcade, $14.95). Loet Velmans was in the Dutch Army in the Dutch East Indies when in March 1942, the Japanese invaded and made prisoners of the Dutch soldiers. For the next three and a half years Velmans and his fellow POWs toiled in slave labor camps, building a railroad through the dense jungle on the Burmese-Thailand border so the Japanese could invade India. Some 200,000 POWs and slave laborers died building this Death Railway. Velmans, though suffering from malaria, dysentery, malnutrition, and unspeakable mistreatment, never gave up hope. Fifty-seven years later he returned to revisit the place where he should have died and where he had buried his closest friend. From that emotional visit sprung this stunning memoir.

 

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