Upcoming Events at The Bookworm

The author signings, in-house book clubs and other events shown below are free and open to the public.     

The Bookworm offers in-house book clubs that you can attend when the featured books fit your interests and schedule. Readers receive a 20% book club discount on the books selected for discussion. The Bookworm provides facilitators to help lead the discussions for many of the in-house book clubs. If you have suggestions for groups, or are willing to facilitate discussions, please let us know

 Why buy books in your local independent bookstore?

  •  You may be about  to make a purchase you'll value for the rest of your life
  • You'll be shopping where you live
  • You'll be helping create local jobs
  • You might just find a book you never knew existed
  • You'll find great gifts for friends and family
  • You can talk to real people about books they know and love
  • You'll be part of your local book-loving community

 

 

Wednesday, December 13 / 6:30 p.m. | The Wednesday Bookworms will discuss Shanghai Girls by Lisa See (Random House, $16.00).  In 1937 Shanghai twenty-one-year-old Pearl Chin and her younger sister, May, are having the time of their lives. Both are beautiful, modern, and carefree until the day their father tells them that he has gambled away their wealth. To repay his debts, he must sell the girls as wives to suitors who have traveled from Los Angeles to find Chinese brides. As Japanese bombs fall on their beloved city, Pearl and May set out on the journey of a lifetime, from the Chinese countryside to the shores of America. Though inseparable best friends, the sisters also harbor petty jealousies and rivalries. They make terrible sacrifices, face impossible choices, and confront a devastating, life-changing secret, but through it all the two hold fast to who they are. 

 

 

 

Thursday, December 14 / 6 p.m. | Amiable Adult Readers Discussing Books Almost Always Read by Kids (Aardbaark) will meet to select books for discussion in 2018.

 

 

Thursday, December 14 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group will discuss Straw Dogs: Thoughts on Humans and Other Animals by John Gray (Farrar Straus Giroux, $17.00). Straw Dogs is an exciting, radical work of philosophy, which sets out to challenge our most cherished assumptions about what it means to be human. From Plato to Christianity, from the Enlightenment to Nietzsche and Marx, the Western tradition has been based on arrogant and erroneous beliefs about human beings and their place in the world. Philosophies such as liberalism and Marxism think of humankind as a species whose destiny is to transcend natural limits and conquer the Earth. John Gray argues that this belief in human difference is a dangerous illusion and explores how the world and human life look once humanism has been finally abandoned. The result is an exhilarating, sometimes disturbing book that leads the reader to question our deepest-held beliefs. 

 

 

 

Sunday, December 17 / 1 p.m. | Come home for the holidays with books that celebrate Omaha and Nebraska (and perhaps learn more about where we call home). Six authors will sign:

Eileen Wirth will sign Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium (History Press, $21.99). Long ranked as one of the top zoos in America and even the world, Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium's history has remained untold, until now. Beginning as little more than a menagerie, the zoo transformed into a spectacular attraction that now draws two million visitors per year. Supporters responded to innovative features such as the iconic desert dome, the new African Grasslands exhibit, the indoor jungle and the all-encompassing aquarium. More than just a showcase, the zoo also supports renowned wildlife conservation and research programs that help preserve endangered species ranging from coral reefs to tigers. Author Eileen Wirth celebrates the history and promising future of the landmark that continues to elicit great local pride. 

 

 

 

Gretchen Garrison will sign Detour Nebraska: Historic Destinations & Natural Wonders (History Press, $21.99). For many, Nebraska is the flat prairie seen from the interstate. Yet with the Sandhills, bluffs and river valleys, the state has an abundance of riches. The heritage of early settlers is evident. Fort Kearny and Chimney Rock were pioneer harbors. The Fur Trade Museum and the Homestead Monument of America tell of those who came to make a life. Carhenge is unique. The Joslyn Art Museum features world-class art, and the Nebraska National Forest is the largest hand-planted forest in the nation. Native Nebraskan Gretchen Garrison details the places and people that make the Cornhusker State unique. 

 

 

 

Kim Reiner will sign Lost Restaurants of Omaha (History Press, $21.99). Omaha is known for its beef, but the history of its most famous restaurants goes far beyond. The French Cafe was the place to go to celebrate. Piccolo Pete's, Mister C's and Bohemian Cafe helped shape neighborhoods in Little Italy, North Omaha and Little Bohemia. The tales of restaurateurs like the tragic Tolf Hanson; the ever-optimistic Ross Lorello; Anthony Oddo, once a resident at Boys Town; and Giuseppa Marcuzzo, a former bootlegger, also tell the story of the city. Restaurants played a prominent role as history unfolded in Omaha during prohibition, wartime rations, the fight for equal rights and westward expansion. Author Kim Reiner details the fascinating history behind Omaha's classic eateries. 

 

 

 

Mike Kelly will sign Uniquely Omaha: 101 Things to Know about the Big O by Mike Kelly (Omaha World-Herald, $29.95).  No place else is exactly like Omaha, a metropolitan area that’s cosmopolitan — soon to be 1 million people — and yet small enough that neighborhoods actually produce neighbors, most of whom care very much about each other. World-Herald columnist Michael Kelly weaves stories, facts, history and oddities into a paint-by-number — 101 — portrait of the city he knows so well. Celebrities and celebrations, inventions and innovations, artistry and attractions — add it all up, and it’s Uniquely Omaha.

 

 

 

Ryan Roenfeld will sign Wicked Omaha (History Press, $21.99). In old Omaha, the scent of opium wafted through saloon doors, while prostitutes openly solicited customers. When the St. Elmo theater ran short of the usual entertainment, the residents could always fall back on robbing strangers. Tenants of the Burnt District squirmed under the extorting thumb of a furniture dealer dubbed the Man-Landlady. The games of chance and confidence and outright municipal graft all played a part in a wicked city where gambler Tom Dennison ran politics and Madam Anna Wilson drove philanthropy. Join Ryan Roenfeld for a stroll along the seamier side of Omaha's past

 

 

 

Jeff Barnes will sign 150 @ 150 – Nebraska’s Landmark Buildings at the State’s Sesquicentennial (Architectural Foundation of Nebraska, $29.95). 150@150 is a celebration of the built world of Nebraska in its 150th anniversary of statehood. This colorful, richly photographed collection includes the earliest buildings constructed by newcomers to the territory, its most recognizable landmarks, and the newest and most dynamic structures designed by the architectural firms of today.

 

 

 

 

December 18 - 20  | The Droids and Dragons Book Club,  the International Intrigue Book Group and the Mysterious Readers Book Group will not meet in December

 

 

Thursday, December 21 / 6 p.m. | The World War II At Night Group will discuss After D-Day: Operation Cobra and the Normandy Breakout by James Jay Cerafano (Stackpole, $19.95). After storming the beaches on D-Day, June 6, 1944, the Allied invasion of France bogged down in seven weeks of grueling attrition in Normandy. On July 25, U.S. divisions under Gen. Omar Bradley launched Operation Cobra, an attempt to break out of the hedgerows and begin a war of movement across France. Despite a disastrous start, with misdropped bombs killing hundreds of GIs, Cobra proved to be one of the most pivotal battles of World War II, successfully breaking the stalemate in Normandy and clearing a path into occupied France. 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, December 21 / 6:30 p.m. | The As the Worm Turns Book Group will discuss Pearl Harbor Christmas: A World At War, December 1941 by Stanley Weintraub (Da Capo, $14.00). Christmas 1941 came little more than two weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The shock was worldwide. While Americans attempted to go about celebrating as usual, the reality of the just-declared war was on everybody's mind. United States troops on Wake Island were battling a Japanese landing force and, in the Philippines, losing the fight to save Luzon. In Japan, the Pearl Harbor strike force returned to Hiroshima Bay and toasted its sweeping success. Across the Atlantic, much of Europe was frozen in grim Nazi occupation. Just three days before Christmas, Churchill surprised Roosevelt with an unprecedented trip to Washington, where they jointly lit the White House Christmas tree. As the two Allied leaders met to map out a winning wartime strategy, the most remarkable Christmas of the century played out across the globe. Pearl Harbor Christmas is a deeply moving and inspiring story about what it was like to live through a holiday season few would ever forget. Carl Wirth will lead the discussion. 

 

 

 

December 23 - 27  | The American History Book Club, the World War II Book Group,  the Books To Die For Group, the Crime Through Time Book Group, and the Mysterious Readers Book Group will not meet in December.

 

Sunday, December 24 | The Bookworm will open at 9:00 a.m. and close at 4:00 p.m. for Christmas Eve.

Monday, December 25 | The Bookworm will be closed in observance of Christmas Day.

 

 

Thursday, December 28 / 2 p.m. | Cather and Friends reads and discusses the work of Willa Cather, her contemporaries, and fellow Nebraskans.  Tea will be served, so bring your favorite cup. Please call 402-392-2877 to register or sign up at the store. The book for December discussion will be Journey into Christmas and Other Stories by Bess Streeter Aldrich (Bison, $19.95). The true meaning of Christmas emerges in these stories about reunited families, good fellowship, and restored faith. This is not to say that all is sugar candy. The mother in the title story faces a lonely Christmas in an empty house-but then something quite ordinary but miraculous happens. In "The Drum Goes Dead," a small-town bank cashier, a solid citizen and sterling friend, is dispirited by hard times until he discovers, through his own resources, that it is indeed a wonderful life. Here are nine other holiday stories, by turns dramatic, humorous, and inspirational. The closing piece recalls the author's childhood in Iowa.  

 

 

 

Thursday, December 28 / 6 p.m. | The Philosophy Book Discussion Group will continue their discussion of Straw Dogs: Thoughts on Humans and Other Animals by John Gray (Farrar Straus Giroux, $17.00). Straw Dogs is an exciting, radical work of philosophy, which sets out to challenge our most cherished assumptions about what it means to be human. From Plato to Christianity, from the Enlightenment to Nietzsche and Marx, the Western tradition has been based on arrogant and erroneous beliefs about human beings and their place in the world. Philosophies such as liberalism and Marxism think of humankind as a species whose destiny is to transcend natural limits and conquer the Earth. John Gray argues that this belief in human difference is a dangerous illusion and explores how the world and human life look once humanism has been finally abandoned. The result is an exhilarating, sometimes disturbing book that leads the reader to question our deepest-held beliefs. 

 

 

 

Sunday, December 31 | The Bookworm will open at 11:00 a.m. and close at 4:00 p.m. for New Year’s Eve.

Monday, January 1 | The Bookworm will be closed in observance of New Year’s Day.

 

 

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