Upcoming Events at The Bookworm

The author signings, in-house book clubs and other events shown below are free and open to the public.

The Bookworm offers in-house book clubs that you can attend when the featured books fit your interests and schedule. Readers receive a 20% book club discount on the books selected for discussion. The Bookworm provides facilitators to help lead the discussions for many of the in-house book clubs. If you have suggestions for groups, or are willing to facilitate discussions, please let us know.

 

Thursday, August 21 / 10 a.m. | Whitney and Matt Hardesty will be at Wiggleworms Storytime to read his book, Monsters Beware (Redbrush Publishing, $16.99). Come and hear about defense against monsters! 



Thursday, August 21 / 6 p.m. | The World War II At Night Group will discuss A Higher Call: An Incredible True Story of Combat and Chivalry in the War-Torn Skies of World War II by Adam Makos (Berkley, $17.00). December, 1943: A badly damaged American bomber struggles to fly over wartime Germany. At the controls is twenty-one-year-old Second Lieutenant Charlie Brown. Half his crew lay wounded or dead on this, their first mission. Suddenly, a Messerschmitt fighter pulls up on the bomber's tail. The pilot is German ace Franz Stigler--and he can destroy the young American crew with the squeeze of a trigger... What happened next would defy imagination and later be called "the most incredible encounter between enemies in World War II." The U.S. 8th Air Force would later classify what happened between them as "top secret." It was an act that Franz could never mention for fear of facing a firing squad. It was the encounter that would haunt both Charlie and Franz for forty years until, as old men, they would search the world for each other, a last mission that could change their lives forever.





Thursday, August 21 / 6:30 p.m. | Rainbow Rowell will sign Landline (St. Martin’s, $24.99). Georgie McCool knows her marriage is in trouble. That it’s been in trouble for a long time. She still loves her husband, Neal, and Neal still loves her, deeply—but that almost seems beside the point now. Maybe that was always beside the point. Two days before they’re supposed to visit Neal’s family in Omaha for Christmas, Georgie tells Neal that she can’t go. She’s a TV writer, and something’s come up on her show; she has to stay in Los Angeles. She knows that Neal will be upset with her—Neal is always a little upset with Georgie—but she doesn’t expect to him to pack up the kids and go without her. When her husband and the kids leave for the airport, Georgie wonders if she’s finally done it. If she’s ruined everything. That night, Georgie discovers a way to communicate with Neal in the past. It’s not time travel, not exactly, but she feels like she’s been given an opportunity to fix her marriage before it starts. . . . Is that what she’s supposed to do?





Thursday, August 21 / 6:30 p.m. | The As the Worm Turns Book Group will discuss Homicide in Hardcover: A Bibliophile Mystery by Kate Carlisle (Obsidian, $7.99). The streets of San Francisco would be lined with hardcovers if rare book expert Brooklyn Wainwright had her way. And her mentor wouldn't be lying in a pool of his own blood on the eve of a celebration for his latest book restoration. With his final breath he leaves Brooklyn a cryptic message, and gives her a priceless and supposedly cursed copy of Goethe's Faust for safekeeping. Brooklyn suddenly finds herself accused of murder and theft, thanks to the humorless but attractive British security officer who finds her kneeling over the body. Now she has to read the clues left behind by her mentor if she is going to restore justice? Sharon Larson will facilitate the discussion. Space is limited, so please call to reserve your place.





Saturday, August 23 / 10 a.m. | The Civil War Book Group will discuss Libby Prison Breakout by Joseph Wheelan (PublicAffairs, $14.99). During the winter of 1863-1864, 1,200 Union officers lived in squalor and semi-starvation in Richmond's Libby Prison, known as "The Bastille of the South." On February 9, 109 of those officers wriggled through a fifty-five-foot tunnel to freedom. After an all-out Rebel manhunt, survivors reached Washington, and their testimony spurred far-reaching investigations into the treatment of Union prisoners. Libby Prison Breakout tells the largely unknown story of the most important escape of the Civil War from a Confederate prison, one that ultimately increased the North's and South's willingness to use prisoners in waging "total war."





Saturday, August 23 / 10:30 a.m. | Saturday Morning Story Time with Mr. Scott! On Saturday mornings Scott Kurz from the Brigit Saint Brigit Theatre will make stories come alive with dramatic reading from books suitable for ages 3 to 8. The theme for each Saturday will be announced a week in advance via Brigit email, and at Bridget’s website www.bsbtheatre.com. It’ll always be free and it’ll always be fun!





Saturday, August 23 / 2 to 4 p.m. | Retirement Tea for Ellen Scott - Join us as we celebrate Ellen’s illustrious bookselling career with tea and treats. Ellen has announced her retirement from day to day activities, but will continue working with schools and coordinating children's and young adult author events. Ellen’s passion for books and bookstores began long ago. She and her mother Priscilla Wheeler operated their children’s bookstore, The Bookhouse, from 1978 to 1996. She also found time to be a classroom teacher. Ellen has managed The Bookworm's Children's Department since 2001. New chapters for Ellen will include tutoring, genealogy, tea parties with friends, working in the church library and of course part-time at The Bookworm.  Please join us to not only thank Ellen for all the wonderful authors she has introduced us to over the years but also to meet Kathy (Scout) Pettersen, the new manager of the Children's Department. Scout has an extensive background in bookselling starting in 1977.  We are delighted to have her join The Bookworm family. 





Sunday, August 24 / 3:30 p.m. | Ben Carson will sign One Nation: What We Can All Do to Save America's Future (Sentinel, $25.95). Ben Carson says “In February 2013 I gave a speech at the National Prayer Breakfast. I warned my fellow citizens of the dangers facing our country and called for a return to the principles that made America great. We seem to have lost our ability to discuss important issues calmly and respectfully regardless of party affiliation or other differences. As a doctor rather than a politician, I care about what works, not whether someone has an (R) or a (D) after his or her name. We have to come together to solve our problems. I have endeavored to propose a road out of our decline, appealing to every American’s decency and common sense. If each of us sits back and expects someone else to take action, it will soon be too late. But with your help, I firmly believe that America may once again be “one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” Signing restrictions will apply.





Monday, August 25 / 2 p.m. | The World War II Book Group will discuss The Girls of Atomic City by Denise Kiernan (Touchstone, $16.00). In 1943 the United States government recruited thousands of young women from across the country to work at “Site X,” a city that, as far as the rest of the world knew, didn’t exist. Told only what they were required to know to perform their individual jobs, and working in ignorance of their ultimate purpose, they had a front-row seat to history. The Girls of Atomic City weaves interviews with the last surviving members of this unique sisterhood into a full portrait of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Drawing on a wealth of original research, this extraordinary bestseller recounts the incredible true story about a city not found on any map and the women who lived and worked there in complete secrecy to help create the weapon designed to end World War II. Kiernan takes readers to an extraordinary community whose mission was world-changing and whose residents, many of them away from home for the first time, struggled to live normal lives in a place that was anything but.





Tuesday, August 26/ 6:30 p.m. | The Crime Through Time Book Group will discuss Morality Play by Barry Unsworth (Norton, $13.95). The time is the fourteenth century. The place is a small town in rural England, and the setting a snow-laden winter. A small troupe of actors accompanied by Nicholas Barber, a young renegade priest, prepare to play the drama of their lives. Breaking the longstanding tradition of only performing religious plays, the group’s leader, Martin, wants them to enact the murder that is foremost in the townspeople’s minds. A young boy has been found dead, and a mute-and-deaf girl has been arrested and stands to be hanged for the murder. As members of the troupe delve deeper into the circumstances of the murder, they find themselves entering a political and class feud that may undo them.







Wednesday, August 27 / 6:30 p.m. | One of our favorite authors, Louise Penny, will visit The Bookworm on Friday, August 29 to sign her tenth and latest novel, The Long Way Home, featuring Chief Inspector Armand Gamache of the Quebec Surete and set in Three Pines, Quebec. To bring everyone’s reading up to date we are continuing the Louise Penny Discussion Group with her third and fourth novels, The Cruelest Month and A Rule Against Murder (both Minotaur, $15.99 each). Janet Grojean will facilitate the discussion. All readers are welcome, if discovering Louise for the first time or if refreshing acquaintanceship with an old friend. Her books are designed to be self-standing, but there is quite a strong character development arc. We think you'd enjoy the books even more if read in order. See www.louisepenny.com for more information and the order of her books.





Thursday, August 28 / 6:30 p.m. | The Enquiring Minds Group will discuss Ethics: A Very Short Introduction by Simon Blackburn (Oxford, $11.95). Ethics is the area of philosophy which touches most on everyday life - its central theme is how we ought to live. Our self-image as moral, well-behaved creatures is dogged by scepticism, relativism, hypocrisy, and nihilism, by the fear that in a Godless world science has unmasked us as creatures fated by our genes to be selfish and tribalistic, or competitive and aggressive. In this clear introduction to ethics Simon Blackburn tackles the major moral questions surrounding birth, death, happiness, desire and freedom, showing us how we should think about the meaning of life, and how we should mistrust the sound bite-sized absolutes that often dominate moral debates.






Friday, August 29 / 6 p.m. | Louise Penny will sign The Long Way Home (Minotaur, $27.99). Happily retired in the village of Three Pines, Armand Gamache, former Chief Inspector of Homicide with the Sûreté du Québec, has found a peace he’d only imagined possible. While Gamache doesn’t talk about his wounds, his neighbor Clara Morrow tells him about hers. Peter, her artist husband, has failed to come home as promised on the first anniversary of their separation. She wants Gamache’s help to find him. Having finally found sanctuary, Gamache feels a near revulsion at the thought of leaving Three Pines. And then he gets up and joins her. Together with his former second-in-command, Jean-Guy Beauvoir, and Myrna Landers, they journey deeper and deeper into Québec. And deeper and deeper into the soul of Peter Morrow. A man so desperate to recapture his fame as an artist, he would sell that soul. And may have. The journey takes them further and further from Three Pines, to the very mouth of the great St. Lawrence river.  To an area so desolate, so damned, the first mariners called it "the land God gave to Cain." And there they discover the terrible damage done by a sin-sick soul. Signing restrictions will apply.




Saturday August 30 / 10 a.m. | The U.S. Presidents/ group will discuss Harry S. Truman by Robert Dallek (Times Books, $23.00). Truman ushered America into the nuclear age, established the alliances and principles that would define the cold war and the national security state, started the nation on the road to civil rights, and won the most dramatic election of the twentieth century—his 1948 “whistlestop campaign” against Thomas E. Dewey. Dallek shows how this unassuming yet supremely confident man rose to the occasion. Truman clashed with Southerners over civil rights, with organized labor over the right to strike, and with General Douglas MacArthur over the conduct of the Korean War. He personified Thomas Jefferson’s observation that the presidency is a “splendid misery,” but it was during his tenure that the United States truly came of age. The group will take a field trip to the Truman Presidential Library and Museum in Independence, Missouri on Saturday, September 20.




Monday, September 1 | The Bookworm will be closed in observance of Labor Day.




Tuesday, September 2 / 1 p.m. | The Art Discussion Group will discuss The Art Spirit by Robert Henri (Basic Books, $19.95). Robert Henri was born in Cincinnati in 1865 and died in 1929. He led the Ashcan School movement in art, and attracted a large, intensely personal group of followers. His paintings are shown at major museums across the United States. Embodying the entire system of Robert Henri's teaching, The Art Spirit contains much valuable advice, critical comment, and inspiration to every student of the arts.






Wednesday, September 3 / Noon - 1 p.m. | What Are You Reading? book chat. Join us to chat about favorite reads, books that changed your life, or the book you just couldn’t put down. No need to make reservations--just come and enjoy a little conversation about books. Carol Lynch facilitates the discussions.




Thursday, September 4 / 10 a.m. | Shelley Wilson will entertain at Wiggleworms Storytime with her newest book, Mokie and Kade: Backyard Adventure (Turtle River Productions, $12.95).   Shelley will lead you on a grand adventure.




Saturday, September 6 / 10:30 a.m. | Saturday Morning Story Time with Mr. Scott! On Saturday mornings Scott Kurz from the Brigit Saint Brigit Theatre will make stories come alive with dramatic reading from books suitable for ages 3 to 8. The theme for each Saturday will be announced a week in advance via Brigit email, and at Bridget’s website www.bsbtheatre.com. It’ll always be free and it’ll always be fun!




Sunday, September 7 / 1:00 p.m. | Matt Holland will sign Ahead of Their Time: The Story of the Omaha DePorres Club (CreateSpace, $16). Before Civil Rights heroes like Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King made their courageous stands, before the creation of the iconic images that represent the struggle against racism in the United States- before there even was a Civil Rights Movement – there was the story of the Omaha DePorres Club. Holland recounts the events that led to the creation of the Omaha DePorres Club and traces the club’s evolution from 1947 to 1960 – revealing the courage and camaraderie of club members as well as the challenges, fears and failures they faced as they ventured into the uncharted territory of the early Civil Rights Movement.






Monday, September 8 / 6:30 p.m. | The I Should Have Read That in School classics group will discuss Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut (Delta, $15.00). Billy Pilgrim is the son of an American barber. He serves as a chaplain's assistant in World War II, is captured by the Germans, and he survives the largest massacre in European history--the fire bombing of Dresden. After the war Billy makes a great deal of money as an optometrist, and on his wedding night he is kidnapped by a flying saucer from the planet Tralfamadore. So begins a modern classic by a master storyteller.







Wednesday, September 10 / 6:30 p.m. | The Wednesday Bookworms will discuss Mother Tongue by Bill Bryson (Morrow, $14.99). Bryson brilliantly explores the remarkable history, eccentricities, resilience and sheer fun of the English language. From the first descent of the larynx into the throat (why you can talk but your dog can't), to the fine lost art of swearing, Bryson tells the fascinating, often uproarious story of an inadequate, second-rate tongue of peasants that developed into one of the world's largest growth industries.







Thursday, September 11 / 6 p.m. | Pamela Carter Joern will sign In Reach (Bison, $18.95). In writing both rich and evocative, Pamela Carter Joern conjures the small plains town of Reach, Nebraska, where residents are stuck tight in the tension between loneliness and the risks of relationships. With insight, wry humor, and deep compassion, Joern renders a cast of recurring characters engaged in battles public and private, epic and mundane: a husband and wife find themselves the center of a local scandal; a widow yearns for companionship, but on her own terms; a father and son struggle with their broken relationship; a man longs for escape from a community's limited view of love; a boy's misguided attempt to protect his brother results in a senseless tragedy. In the town of Reach, where there is hope and hardship, connections may happen in surprising ways or lie achingly beyond grasp.





Thursday, September 11 / 6 p.m. | Amiable Adult Readers Discussing Books Almost Always Read by Kids (Aardbaark) will discuss Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (St Martin’s Griffin, $18.99). Set over the course of one school year in 1986, this is the story of two star-crossed misfits-smart enough to know that first love almost never lasts, but brave and desperate enough to try. When Eleanor meets Park, you'll remember your own first love-and just how hard it pulled you under. ”Eleanor & Park reminded me not just what it's like to be young and in love with a girl, but also what it's like to be young and in love with a book."-John Green, The New York Times Book Review.






Friday, September 12 / 6:30 p.m. | GET LIT with Brigit Saint Brigit Theatre explores the Southern Gothic genre with readings from A Good Man Is Hard to Find by Flannery O'Connor and That Evening Sun by William Faulkner.  On the second Friday of each month actors will give vivid voice to animate readings that traverse all the genres of literature. The readings will run less than an hour, and will be followed by some sprightly discussion for those in the mood. Designed as an informal but satisfying after-supper interlude, it will deliver a whimsical and unique wind-down from the work week/wind-up for the weekend. The selections will be announced a week in advance via Brigit email and at Brigit’s website www.bsbtheatre.com.




Friday and Saturday, September 12 and 13 | The Bookworm will sell books at the Omaha Lit Fest held at the W. Dale Clark branch of Omaha Public Library, 215 South 15th St. See www.omahalitfest.com for featured authors and more information.




Saturday, September 13 / 10:00 a.m. | The Sherlock Holmes group will discuss “The Adventure of the Creeping Man” from The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes. These stories are included in Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Novels and Stories, volume 2 by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Bantam Classics, $6.95). All Sherlock Holmes fans are welcome.








Saturday, September 13 / 10:30 a.m. | Saturday Morning Story Time with Mr. Scott! On Saturday mornings Scott Kurz from the Brigit Saint Brigit Theatre will make stories come alive with dramatic reading from books suitable for ages 3 to 8. The theme for each Saturday will be announced a week in advance via Brigit email, and at Bridget’s website www.bsbtheatre.com. It’ll always be free and it’ll always be fun!




Sunday, September 14 / 11 a.m. | The book group Books and Bagels will discuss The Light Between Oceans by M. L. Stedman (Scribner, $16.00). After four harrowing years on the Western Front, Tom Sherbourne returns to Australia and takes a job as the lighthouse keeper on Janus Rock. To this isolated island where the supply boat comes once a season, Tom brings a young, bold, and loving wife, Isabel. Years later, after two miscarriages and one stillbirth, the grieving Isabel hears a baby’s cries on the wind. A boat has washed up onshore carrying a dead man and a living baby. Tom, who keeps meticulous records and whose moral principles have withstood a horrific war, wants to report the man and infant immediately. But Isabel insists the baby is a “gift from God,” and against Tom’s judgment, they claim her as their own and name her Lucy. When she is two, Tom and Isabel return to the mainland and are reminded that there are other people in the world. Their choice has devastated one of them.




Sunday, September 14 / 1 p.m. | Jeremy H. Lipschultz will sign Social Media Communication: Concepts, Practices, Data, Law and Ethics (Routledge, $49.95). Lipschultz presents a wide-scale, interdisciplinary analysis and guide to social media. Examining platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Youtube and Vine, he explores and analyzes journalism, broadcasting, public relations, advertising and marketing. Lipschultz focuses on key concepts, best practices, data analyses, law and ethics--all promoting the critical thinking professionals and students need to use new networking tools effectively and to navigate social and mobile media spaces. Featuring contemporary case studies, essays from some of the industry's leading social media innovators, and a comprehensive glossary, this practical, multipurpose book gives readers the resources they'll need to both evaluate and utilize current and future forms of social media.




Monday, September 15 | Join a Book and Movie Club this fall for just three months! The Bookworm in partnership with locally owned Aksarben Cinema invites you to read and discuss three bestselling novels and then watch the movie. Register for these events individually or for all three. Contact The Bookworm at 402.392.2877 or info@bookwormomaha.com to register. The books will be available at The Bookworm at the book club discounted price. The movie tickets will be available at the senior discount price at the theater the day of the event. The discussions will take place in the party room at Aksarben Cinema, 2110 South 67th Street. The September 15 book and movie, starring Jason Bateman, Tina Fey and Jane Fonda, is This is Where I Leave You by Jonathan Tropper (Plume Books, $16.00). The death of Judd Foxman's father marks the first time that the entire Foxman clan has congregated in years. There is, however, one conspicuous absence: Judd's wife, Jen, whose affair with his radio- shock-jock boss has recently become painfully public. Simultaneously mourning the demise of his father and his marriage, Judd joins his dysfunctional family as they reluctantly sit shiva-and spend seven days and nights under the same roof. The week quickly spins out of control as longstanding grudges resurface, secrets are revealed and old passions are reawakened. Then Jen delivers the clincher: she's pregnant. 




Tuesday, September 16 / 6:30 p.m. | The International Intrigue Book Group will discuss The Lost Army of Cambyses by Paul Sussman (Grove, $14.00). In 523 BC, the Persian pharaoh Cambyses dispatched an army across Egypt's western desert to destroy the oracle at Siwa. Legend has it that somewhere in the middle of the Great Dune Sea his army was overwhelmed by a sandstorm and lost forever. Two and a half millennia later a mutilated corpse is washed up on the banks of the Nile at Luxor, an antique dealer is savagely murdered in Cairo, and a British archaeologist is found dead at the ancient necropolis of Saqqara. The incidents appear unconnected, but Inspector Yusuf Khalifa of the Luxor police is suspicious, as is the archaeologist's daughter, Tara Mullray. Lured into a labyrinth of intrigue, violence, and betrayal by a mysterious hieroglyphic fragment and rumors of a mythic lost tomb, what began as a search for the truth becomes a race for survival.




Thursday, September 18 | Join a Young Adult Book and Movie Club this fall for just three months! The Bookworm in partnership with locally owned Aksarben Cinema invites you to read and discuss three bestselling dystopian young adult novels and then watch the movie. Register for these events individually or for all three. Contact The Bookworm at 402.392.2877 or childrens@bookwormomaha.com to register. The books will be available at The Bookworm at the book club discounted price. The movie tickets will be available at the theater the day of the event. The discussions will take place in the party room at Aksarben Cinema, 2110 South 67th Street. The September 18 book and movie, starring Dylan O’Brien, is The Maze Runner by James Dashner (Delacorte, $10.99). If you ain’t scared, you ain’t human. When Thomas wakes up in the lift, the only thing he can remember is his name. He’s surrounded by strangers—boys whose memories are also gone. Nice to meet ya, shank. Welcome to the Glade. Outside the towering stone walls that surround the Glade is a limitless, ever-changing maze. It’s the only way out—and no one’s ever made it through alive. Everything is going to change. Then a girl arrives. The first girl ever. And the message she delivers is terrifying. Remember. Survive. Run.




Thursday, September 18 / 6 p.m. | The World War II At Night Group will discuss Infantry Attacks by Erwin Rommel (Zenith, $19.95). In this classic study, Rommel analyzes the tactics that lay behind his success. First published in 1937, it quickly became a highly regarded military textbook. As a leader of a small unit in the First World War, Rommel proved himself an aggressive and versatile commander, with a reputation for using the battleground terrain to his own advantage, for gathering intelligence, and for seeking out and exploiting enemy weaknesses. Rommel graphically describes his own achievements, and those of his units, in the swift-moving battles on the Western Front, in the ensuing trench warfare, in the 1917 campaign in Romania, and in the pursuit across the Tagliamento and Piave rivers. This account seeks out the basis of his astonishing leadership skills, providing an indispensable guide to the art of war written by one of its greatest exponents.




Thursday, September 18 / 6:30 p.m. | The As the Worm Turns Book Group will discuss True Sisters by Sandra Dallas (St. Martin’s, $14.99). In 1856, Mormon converts set out on foot from Iowa City to Salt Lake City. True Sisters tells the story of four women whose lives will become inextricably linked as they endure unimaginable hardships, each one testing the boundaries of her faith and learning the true meaning of survival and friendship along the way: Nannie, who is traveling with her sister and brother-in-law after being abandoned on her wedding day; Louisa, who's married to an overbearing church leader who she believes speaks for God; Jessie, who's traveling with her brothers, each one of them dreaming of the farm they will have in Zion; and Anne, who hasn't converted to Mormonism but who has no choice but to follow her husband since he has sold everything to make the trek to Utah. Jan Amidon will facilitate the discussion.




Saturday, September 20 / 10:30 a.m. | Saturday Morning Story Time with Mr. Scott! On Saturday mornings Scott Kurz from the Brigit Saint Brigit Theatre will make stories come alive with dramatic reading from books suitable for ages 3 to 8. The theme for each Saturday will be announced a week in advance via Brigit email, and at Bridget’s website www.bsbtheatre.com. It’ll always be free and it’ll always be fun!




Monday, September 22 / 2 p.m. | The World War II Book Group will discuss Bonheoffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy by Eric Metaxas (Thomas Nelson, $19.99). As Adolf Hitler and the Nazis seduced a nation, bullied a continent, and attempted to exterminate the Jews of Europe, a small number of dissidents and saboteurs worked to dismantle the Third Reich from the inside. One of these was Dietrich Bonhoeffer-a pastor and author. Metaxas takes both strands of Bonhoeffer's life-the theologian and the spy-and draws them together to tell a searing story of incredible moral courage in the face of monstrous evil. Metaxas presents the fullest accounting of Bonhoeffer's heart-wrenching decision to leave the safe haven of America to return to Hitler's Germany, and sheds new light on Bonhoeffer's involvement in the famous Valkyrie plot and in "Operation 7," the effort to smuggle Jews into neutral Switzerland.




Tuesday, September 23/ 6:30 p.m. | The Crime Through Time Book Group will discuss Prophecy: An Elizabethan Thriller by S. J. Parris (Anchor, $15.95). It is the year of the Great Conjunction, the year the powerful planets of Saturn and Jupiter align to herald the end of one age and the dawn of another, and the streets of London are abuzz with predictions of Queen Elizabeth's death. When one of the queen's ladies is found dead amidst rumors of black magic, Elizabeth calls upon Giordano Bruno to solve the crimes, along with the help of her personal astrologer, John Dee. But while Dee turns to a mysterious medium claiming knowledge of the murders, Bruno fears that something far more sinister is at work.




Wednesday, September 24 | The Bookworm will sell books at a Town Hall Lecture Series event featuring Billie Jean King, author of Pressure Is a Privilege: Lessons I've Learned from Life and the Battle of the Sexes (Lifetime, $19.95). See www.omahatownhall.org for more information.




Wednesday, September 24 / 6 p.m. | Omaha World-Herald editorial cartoonist Jeff Koterba will sign Koterba: Drawing You In (Omaha World-Herald, $29.95). Jeff Koterba illustrates with impact. Since 1989 he has delivered humorous, and often biting, commentary on everything from politics to potholes to pop culture. No matter the topic or your opinion, Jeff tells how he does it and shows you some of his favorites.








Thursday, September 25 / 6:30 p.m. | The Enquiring Minds Group will discuss The Marquis de Sade: A Very Short Introduction  by John Phillips (Oxford, $11.95). Phillips introduces the Marquis de Sade as writer and philosopher, offering concise but comprehensive surveys of his most controversial works, based on contemporary theoretical approaches. An introductory chapter discusses Sade's life and the links between that and his work. Relying on the many letters he wrote to his wife and lawyer from prison and on other authentic, contemporary evidence, the author attempts to disentangle this life from the various myths that Sade's demonic reputation has engendered throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The following six chapters provide broad coverage of Sade's main intellectual and creative activities, showing how all can be seen as the expression of a veritable cult of the body, a veneration of the physical, and the sexual as channels of transcendence.




Friday, September 26 / 7 - 7:30 p.m. | Momaha Night Time Story Time for preschoolers, ages 1 – 5. Put the kids in their pajamas, bring along their favorite stuffed animal, and treat them to an early bedtime story. Expect a little singing, dancing and other fun activities. We’ll have the milk and cookies ready. See www.momaha.com for more information.




Saturday, September 27 / 10 a.m. | The Civil War Book Group will discuss Plenty of Blame to Go Around: Jeb Stuart's Controversial Ride to Gettysburg by Eric Wittenberg and David Petruzzi (Savas Beatie, $22.95). June 1863. The Gettysburg Campaign is in its opening hours. Harness jingles and hoofs pound as Confederate cavalryman James Ewell Brown (JEB) Stuart leads his three brigades of veteran troopers on a ride that triggers one of the Civil Wars most bitter and enduring controversies. Instead of finding glory and victory, two objectives with which he was intimately familiar, Stuart reaped stinging criticism and substantial blame for one of the Confederacy’s most stunning and unexpected battlefield defeats. Plenty of Blame to Go Around investigates the role Stuarts horsemen played in the disastrous campaign. 




Saturday, September 27 / 10:30 a.m. | Saturday Morning Story Time with Mr. Scott! On Saturday mornings Scott Kurz from the Brigit Saint Brigit Theatre will make stories come alive with dramatic reading from books suitable for ages 3 to 8. The theme for each Saturday will be announced a week in advance via Brigit email and at Bridget’s website www.bsbtheatre.com. It’ll always be free and it’ll always be fun!




Sunday, September 28 / 1 p.m. | Vita Coffey will sign Little V’s Hope ($11.99). In 2000, Vita Coffey was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. In the decade that followed, she lost not only her sight and ability to walk, but many friends, her job, her father, and nearly her sanity.  Struggling through pain and the debilitating side effects of an ever-changing cocktail of drugs, Vita remained hopeful that one day, she would find a better treatment.  Her participation in a new clinical study restored her life and health—and then some.  In the battle against her disease, Vita faced many uncertain circumstances, clinging to her journal as a source of hope and stability. In Little V’s Hope, Vita tells her story of love, loss, and recovery, in her own words, for the first time.




Wednesday, October 1 | The Bookworm will sell books at a Holland Lecture featuring Eric Liu, author of Gardens of Democracy: The New American Story of Citizenship, the Economy and the Role of Government and A Chinaman's Chance: One Family's Journey and the Chinese American Dream. See www.firstuuomaha.org or call (402) 345-3039 for more information.




Wednesday, October 1 | The Bookworm will sell books at a Creighton Center for Health Policy and Ethics Women & Health Lecture featuring Monique Truong, author of The Book of Salt (Mariner, $13.95) and Bitter in the Mouth (Random House, $15.00). See www.creighton.edu/ for more information.

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